Participants

Reiko Abe Auestad

Reiko Abe Auestad

Professor of Japanese Literature and Language, University of Oslo
Panel: Sōseki's [Dis]orientations

Her areas of interest include modern Japanese literature, cultural and social developments in contemporary Japan, especially vis-à-vis women’s position in it. Her methodological approach has been mainly a text-based and context-oriented analysis of literature and culture. Although her doctoral thesis was on Natsume Sōseki (Rereading Sōseki: Three Early Twentieth-Century Japanese Novels), she has written on various other modern authors such as Nakano Shigeharu, Ogino Anna, Dazai Osamu, Murakami Haruki, and Kirino Natsuo. She is currently working on a selection of modern and contemporary Japanese novels with a focus on affect. She has also published essays on the family politics and welfare system in Japan and Norway from a comparative perspective ("Long-Term Care Insurance, marketization and the quality of care," Japan Forum 2010).

Abstract: Affect That Disorients Kokoro


Pedro Bassoe

Pedro Bassoe

Graduate Student, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Sōseki's Narratology

Pedro Bassoe received his B.A. in Anthropology and Japanese Language from Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana in 2010 and his M.A. in Japanese Literature from the University of Oregon in 2012. His master's thesis focused on kirishitanmono by Akutagawa Ryūnosuke, or stories that imagined the activities of Jesuit Portuguese missionaries in Japan in the 16th and 17th centuries. In his thesis, he explored Akutagawa’s use of obscure language and a fantasized Christian-Japanese dialect that exoticized his subject while also seriously engaging with the theological implications of the Christian religion. He is currently interested in the aesthetic treatment of various religions in modern Japanese literature, visuality and spatiality in the arrangement of a narrative logic, and the representation of the visible and the invisible through text. His authors of interest include Akutagawa Ryūnosuke, Ozaki Kōyō, Kōda Rohan, Higuchi Ichiyō, and Izumi Kyōka.

Abstract: Sōseki, Nude Painting, and the Disappearing Subject


Peter Bernard

Peter Bernard

Ph.D. candidate, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University
Panel: Soseki's [Dis]orientations

Peter Bernard is a second-year Ph.D. student in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. He specializes in modern Japanese literature. He is interested in the history of gensō bungaku (“weird literature”) in modern Japan, and in the formation of an “inaka Gothic” aesthetic through the intersection of gensō and chihō (“regional”) literatures spanning from the late 1880s to the present in the works of such authors as Izumi Kyōka, Kōda Rohan, Kurahashi Yumiko, and Terayama Shūji. He also has an interest in connections between literature and religion in modern Japan, on the one hand, and literature and film, on the other. This has led to current research projects on the place of moral discourses in prewar literature as seen through the lens of Japanese Romanticism, and on shinpa and film adaptations of Kyōka’s works as a prefiguration of the logic of the “media mix.”


Michael K. Bourdaghs

Michael Bourdaghs

Professor of Japanese Literature and Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago
Panel: Sōseki and Others

Michael K. Bourdaghs is Professor of Japanese Literature and Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago. He is the author of The Dawn That Never Comes: Shimazaki Toson and Japanese Nationalism (2003) and Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon: A Geopolitical Prehistory of J-Pop (2012). He was one of the co-editors and translators for Natsume Sōseki's Theory of Literature and Other Critical Writings (2009), which was awarded MLA's 2011 Scaglione Prize for a Translation of a Scholarly Study of Literature. He is currently finishing a book project tentatively titled Owning Up to Sōseki: World Literature Beyond Sociology.

Abstract: Narrating Three Lives: Natsume Sōseki, Gertrude Stein, William James


Nina Cornyetz

Nina Cornyetz

Associate Professor, NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study
Panel: Women in the Middle

Nina Cornyetz’s teaching and research interests include critical, literary and filmic theory, psychoanalysis, studies of gender and sexuality, and cultural studies, with a specialization in Japan. Among her recent publications are: Perversion and Modern Japan: Psychoanalysis, Literature, Culture, co-edited with J. Keith Vincent, and “Murakami Takashi and the Hell of Others: Sexual (in)Difference, The Eye and the Gaze in Murakami, ” in Criticism.

Abstract: What Does Sōsuke Want? Marriage, Boredom and Crisis in Sōseki’s Mon


Michael Craig

Michael Craig

Ph.D. candidate, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Asymptotic Intimacies

A Ph.D. candidate in the UC Berkeley Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Mike tends to position his work at the intersections of visual culture, narratology, aesthetics, and ludology. His dissertation examines Japanese Role-Playing Games of the late 1990s, exploring how the videogame industry’s shift towards a three-dimensional standard of game environment design resonates with the increasingly complex human-world interactions depicted in popular media narratives of the same period, notably in the genre of sekai-kei. In particular, he is interested in how the fractured narrative structures of such games may complicate videogame theory’s prevailing tendency to read 3D as facilitating a player’s seamless immersion in optically continuous (and thus fluidly actionable) worlds. Other interests include postwar fiction, the histories of psychology and modern philosophy, theories of the comic, and the portrayal of consciousness in the novels of Sōseki and Kawabata.

Abstract: “Comic Feeling” (Kokkeikan) and the Narratology of Emotional Distance in Meian


Jessica Crewe

Jessica Crewe

Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley
Panel: Asymptotic Intimacies

Jessica Crewe is a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Her dissertation, titled Distant Reading: Narrative Theory at the Edge of Empire, explores affect and narrative form in fictional representations of late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century British and Japanese colonial spaces.

Abstract: Body Languages: Conscious Bodies and Embodied Consciousness in The Heredity of Taste


Stephen Dodd

Senior Lecturer in Japanese, SOAS, University of London
Panel: Sōseki Translating the World and the World Translating Sōseki

Steve Dodd gained a BA degree in Japanese (1980) from Keble College, Oxford, and a PhD in Japanese Literature from Columbia University (1993). After teaching briefly at UC Santa Barbara (1993), he became Assistant Professor in Japanese Literature at Duke University (1993-94). From 1994, he has taught at SOAS, University of London, where he is Senior Lecturer in Japanese. His articles on modern Japanese literature include “Fantasies, Fairies, and Electric Dreams: Satō Haruo’s Critique of Taishō” (Monumenta Nipponica, 1994), “The Significance of Bodies in Sōseki’s Kokoro” (Monumenta Nipponica, 1998) and “Darkness Transformed: Illness in the Work of Kajii Motojirō,” (Journal of Japanese Studies, Winter, 2007). He is the author of Writing Home: Representations of the Native Place in Modern Japanese Literature (Harvard East Asian monographs, 2004). His latest book, The Youth of Things: Life and Death in the Age of Kajii Motojirō, is due to come out in Spring, 2014.

Abstract: The Translation of Same-Sex Desire in Kokoro


Brian Dowdle

Brian Dowdle

Assistant Professor of Japanese, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, University of Montana
Panel: A Three Cornered World

Brian completed his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. He specializes in the literature of early modern and modern Japan. His research interests lie in the physical reception and reproduction of Edo period-texts, with a particular interest in literary impacts of print media, laws, trade organizations, and technologies of the printing industry. His research reconsiders the discursive reception of Edo-period authors, especially Kyokutei Bakin, in light of their reproduction during the Meiji period. The ubiquity of Sōseki’s descriptions of books—both Western and from the Edo period— provides a fertile ground for reconsidering the diversity and polyvalences of books circulating during the Meiji period.

Abstract: Michikusa, Kusamakura, and Sōseki


Joan Ericson

Joan Ericson

Professor of Japanese and NEH Professor of Humanities at Colorado College
Panel: Sōseki and Others

Joan Ericson teaches Japanese literature, language, and culture courses. Raised in rural Japan, she is bilingual and bicultural, and holds degrees in Japanese Literature from the University of Hawai'i and Columbia University. She has published on the development of the concept of modern Japanese women's literature (Be a Woman: Hayashi Fumiko and Modern Japanese Women's Literature) and has embarked on a new project on the representation of childhood and children's literature in Japan. During the academic year 2010-2011, she was a Fulbright Research Scholar at Doshisha University in Kyoto. Her more recent publications include Manga Botchan and a collaborative translation of tanka composed by witnesses to and survivors of the March 2011 disasters in Japan.


Anna-Marie Farrier

Independent scholar, Tokyo, Japan
Panel: Women in the Middle

Anna-Marie Farrier completed her doctorate at Princeton University in 2007 with a dissertation on the novels of Natsume Soseki and English Gothic fiction. She is currently an independent scholar based in Tokyo.

Abstract: Novel Novelties: Sorekara and the Urban Supernatural


Matthew Fraleigh

Matthew Fraleigh

Associate Professor of East Asian Literature and Culture, Brandeis University
Panel: Sōseki and Asia

Matthew Fraleigh is Associate Professor of East Asian Literature and Culture at Brandeis University, where he chairs the Program in Comparative Literature. His research concerns the literature of early modern and modern Japan, especially kanshibun. His work has appeared in journals such as Japanese Studies, Monumenta Nipponica, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Kokugo kokubun, and the London Review of Books. His annotated translation, New Chronicles of Yanagibashi and Diary of a Journey to the West: Narushima Ryūhoku Reports From Home and Abroad (Cornell, 2010) was awarded the Japan-US Friendship Commission Prize, and in 2012, he received the Sibley Prize for his translation of Ryūhoku's prison essay, Super Secret Tales From the Slammer. His monograph Plucking Chrysanthemums: Narushima Ryūhoku and the Uses of Chinese Tradition in Modern Japan is forthcoming from Harvard University Asia Center. He is currently working on a book concerning literary and cultural interaction between Japan and Taiwan.


Sarah Frederick

Sarah Frederick

Associate Professor of Japanese Literature, Boston University
Panel: Sōseki's [Dis]orientations

Sarah Frederick is the author of Turning Pages: Reading and Writing Women’s Magazines in Interwar Japan (University of Hawaii Press, 2006), and articles in positions: East Asian Cultures Critique, US Japan Women’s Journal and Japan Forum. She was also a contributor to Bad Girls of Japan, Laura Miller and Jan Bardsley, eds. Professor Frederick is currently working on a book project that looks at 20th-century Japanese literature and history through the voluminous works of Yoshiya Nobuko (1896-1973), one of modern Japan’s most commercially successful authors and who is seen as formative of many aspects of girls’ culture (shōjo culture). The project deals with materials from throughout Yoshiya’s writing life, from the 1910s to the 1970s, including her travel writings in Asia during and after the Pacific war, as well as her afterlife in popular girls’ culture, including manga and anime. In addition to the book on Yoshiya Nobuko, she is also beginning work on a joint Digital Humanities project with Alice Tseng (BU, History of Art and Architecture) “Mapping Kyoto” funded in part by the Hariri Institute for Computational Research at Boston University. She has received a BFRI (Bunka Fashion Research Institute) and MEXT Collaborative Fellowship for research on representations of kimono in literary modernism and the modernist and cosmopolitan aspects of kimono wearing and representation. She has also received funding for her research from Fulbright-Hays, Japanese Ministry of Education, and the NEH. She was the Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies Professor in 2008-09 and serves on its executive board.

Abstract: Arriving in Sōseki’s Kyoto: A Digital Humanities Approach to Sōseki?


Andre Haag

Andre Haag

Assistant Professor of Japanese literature and culture, University of New Mexico
Panel: Sōseki and Asia

Andre Haag is an assistant professor of Japanese literature and culture at the University of New Mexico. His current research examines popular colonial discourses surrounding Korean rebellion and “terrorism” in Japanese literary and print media narratives from the Taishō era. He is also currently collaborating on an edited volume about the massacres of ethnic Koreans following the Great Kantō Earthquake of 1923, and working on several translations of Japanese colonial literature from the 1920s and ‘30s.

Abstract: Why was he…well…killed? Natsume Sōseki and (Anti-) Colonial Violence


Kelly Hansen

Kelly Hansen

Assistant Professor of Japanese, Department of Linguistics and Asian/Middle Eastern Languages; and Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, San Diego State University
Panel: A Three Cornered World

Kelly Hansen received her Ph.D. from the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Hawai’i, Manoa, in 2009. She is currently assistant professor of Japanese in the Department of Linguistics and Asian/Middle Eastern Languages, and the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies at San Diego State University. Her primary area of research focuses on the intersection of shifts in literary and linguistic discourse leading to the rise of a modern, vernacular-based written language in late nineteenth-century Japan, stressing the continuity of literary genres and writing styles that have persisted into the modern period. She is currently revising her dissertation into a publishable book manuscript, which will include a chapter on the role of the Chinese imaginary in the writings of Natsume Sōseki.


Sayumi Harb

Sayumi Harb

Assistant Professor of Japanese Studies, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Connecticut College
Panel: Women in the Middle

Sayumi Takahashi Harb is an Assistant Professor of Japanese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Connecticut College. Takahashi Harb graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University (Philosophy, Creative Writing), and holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory from the University of Pennsylvania. Her areas of specialization include Japanese poetics (particularly the work of Bakumatsu poet-artist Otagaki Rengetsu), 19th and 20th century Japanese literature, Japanese cinema, gender studies, word and image studies, and Asian American literature.

Abstract: Penning the Mad Man in the Attic: Women Writers and Imperial Subjects in Sōseki’s Fiction


Brian Hurley

University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Sōseki and Others

Brian’s research focuses on the literary and intellectual life of Japan in the 1920s-1940s. It brings together analyses of expository cultural critique and close readings of literary writing in order to understand the value of aesthetic language within a synchronic sphere of communication. This approach leads to a larger reflection on the possibility and peril of a non-teleological narrative of early Shōwa culture and politics. Working through these problems, his dissertation examines the writings of Yamada Yoshio, Tanizaki Jun’ichirō, Tosaka Jun, Nakano Shigeharu, Miki Kiyoshi and Yokomitsu Riichi. His essay, “Toward a New Modern Vernacular: Tanizaki Jun’ichirō, Yamada Yoshio and Shōwa Restoration Thought,” appeared in The Journal of Japanese Studies in Summer 2013.

Abstract: Tosaka Jun’s Uninvited Keynote: “Enough Culture, Enough Sōseki”


Ken K. Ito

Ken Ito

Professor, Japanese literature, University of Hawai'i
Panel: Sōseki Translating the World and the World Translating Sōseki

Ken K. Ito teaches Japanese literature at the University of Hawai'i. He is the author of An Age of Melodrama: Family, Gender, and Social Hierarchy in the Turn-of-the-Century Japanese Novel, which received the 2010 John W. Hall Prize of the Association for Asian Studies, and Visions of Desire: Tanizaki's Fictional Worlds.

Abstract: Reading Kokoro in High School


Seth Jacobowitz

Seth Jacobowitz

Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University
Panel: Sōseki and Others

Seth Jacobowitz is an Assistant Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University. His latest research project is Writing Technology in Meiji Japan: A Media History, forthcoming by the Harvard Asia Center. He maintains comparative interests in Japanese and Brazilian modern literature, as well as the cultural cross-currents occasioned by the century of Japanese immigration to Brazil that began in 1908.

Abstract: In the Key of Minor Literature: Reading Conventions in Sōseki and Machado de Assis


Yumi Kim

Yumi Kim

Ph.D. candidate, modern Japanese history, Columbia University
Panel: Asymptotic Intimacies

Yumi Kim is a Ph.D. candidate in modern Japanese history at Columbia University. Her dissertation examines the interaction between modern psychiatric and older folk-cultural understandings of madness in Japanese society from the 1870s to the 1930s. It focuses on four case studies of social and cultural phenomena associated with madness during the Edo period, which modern psychiatrists sought to subsume under a new biomedical rubric: belief in fox possession, home confinement of the insane, healing rituals at temples and shrines, and the custom of “double suicide.” Yumi received her B.A. in French and German History and Literature from Harvard University and her M.A. in Japanese Literature from UC Berkeley. She is currently a Mellon Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow of the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) at Columbia.

Abstract: The “Nature” of Hysteria in Natsume Sōseki’s Michikusa (1915)


Saeko Kimura

Saeko Kimura

Professor, Tsuda College, Tokyo; Visiting Professor, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto, Japan
Panel: The Heart in the Machine

Saeko Kimura is Professor at Tsuda College, Tokyo, and Visiting Professor at International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto, Japan. She is the author of A Brief History of Sexuality in Premodern Japan (Tallinn University Press, 2010); Chibusa ha darenomonoka: Nihon chûse ni miru sei to kenryoku (To Whom Belongs the Breast: Sexuality and Power in Medieval Japan, Shinyôsha, 2009); Koisuru monogatari no homosexuality (Homosexuality in Heian Romances, Seidosha, 2008).

Abstract: Reviving Sōseki in the 1970's: Shindo Kaneto's Kokoro


Faye Yuan Kleeman

Faye Kleeman

Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Colorado-Boulder
Panel: Sōseki and Asia

Faye Yuan Kleeman is an associate professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder, Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations. She received a BA from Soochow University (Taipei), MA from Ochanomizu University (Tokyo), and Ph.D. from the University of California (Berkeley). She is the author of several books: Under an Imperial Sun: Japanese Colonial Literature in Taiwan and the South, In Transit: The Formation of an East Asian Cultural Sphere, Dainihon teikoku no kureōru: Shokuminchi Taiwan no Nihongo bungaku (Japanese), Diguo de taiyang xia: Riben de Taiwan ji nanfang zhimindi wenxue (Chinese) and many other articles. Kleeman is the recipient of research grants and fellowships from the Japan Foundation, the Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation, Fulbright Hays Research Grant, and the International Consortium for the Study of the Humanities (Germany). Her research interests include comparative literary and aestheticism in East Asia through literary translation, the consumption of genre fiction, and the cross-fertilization of popular cultures. She has worked on Japanese colonial literature and Japan’s interactions with its East Asian neighbors since the mid-19th century.

Abstract: Empire, Canon, and Patrilineal Legacy in Sōseki and Lu Xun: A global and comparative perspective


Thomas Lamarre

Thomas Lamarre

Professor of Film, Media and East Asian Studies, McGill University
Panel: The Heart in the Machine

Thomas Lamarre is Professor of Film, Media and East Asian Studies at McGill University. He is the author of The Anime Machine: A Media Theory of Animation (Minnesota UP, 2009); Anime mashin: Gurobaru media toshite no Nihon animeshon (Japanese translation of The Anime Machine, The University of Nagoya Press, 2013); Shadows on the Screen: Tanizaki Juni’ichiro on Cinema and Oriental Aesthetics (University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies, 2005); Uncovering Heian Japan: An Archeology of Sensation and Inscription (Duke University Press, 2000).


Hoyt Long

Hoyt Long

Assistant Professor of Japanese literature, University of Chicago
Panel: A Three Cornered World

Hoyt Long is an assistant professor of Japanese literature at the University of Chicago. His first book, On Uneven Ground: Miyazawa Kenji and the Making of Place in Modern Japan (Stanford University Press, 2012), traces genealogies of local imagining as they intersected with cultural and literary production in twentieth-century Japan. He is currently at work on a book that reconstructs a social history of communication in Japan from 1880 to 1930, with a particular focus on practices of postal exchange. Since 2010, he has been utilizing various computational techniques (e.g., network analysis, text mining) to explore the sociology of poetic modernism in East Asia and transnational patterns of literary collaboration and diffusion. He is part of a collaborative project at Chicago called "Global Literary Networks" that extends this work to a global scale.


Margherita Long

Margherita Long

Professor of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages, University of California, Riverside
Panel: Women in the Middle

Margherita Long is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages at the University of California, Riverside. Her first book was This Perversion Called Love: Reading Tanizaki, Feminist Theory and Freud (Stanford University Press, 2009). Her new project is called Post-Fukushima Public Intellectuals and the Problem of Eco-Feminism. With chapters on manga artist Hagio Moto, media theorist Azuma Hiroki, political scientist Kang Sangjung, documentary filmmaker Kamanaka Hitomi and novelist Oe Kenzaburo, this project traces a debate over the force that the material world can and should exert on culture, and on human thought. The first essay will appear as “Hagio Moto's Nuclear Manga and the Promise of Eco-Feminist Desire,” forthcoming in Mechademia 9: Origins, Fall 2014.


Edward Mack

Associate Professor of Japanese, University of Washington
Panel: Sōseki and Others

Edward Mack is an Associate Professor of Japanese at the University of Washington. His book, Manufacturing Modern Japanese Literature: Publishing, Prizes, and the Ascription of Literary Value was published by Duke University Press in 2010. His current research is on Japanese-language literary activities, both reading and writing, in Brazil prior to World War II.

Abstract: Whither Sayoko and Ono? Reading ‘Sōseki’ in São Paolo


Matthew Mewhinney

Matthew Mewhinney

Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Sōseki's Narratology

Matt is a native of San Francisco, and joined the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Berkeley in fall, 2012. He received his B.A. in Japanese and Chinese Studies in 2006, and an M.A. in Asian Studies in 2009 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Before coming to Berkeley, Matt spent two years as an MEXT fellow at Waseda University, where he explored the literary realms of the Meiji, Taishō and early Shōwa periods, with close attention to the composition and circulation of kanshi. At present, his research examines the relationship between classical poetic forms and modern subjectivity. Other interests include literary modernism, East Asian imperialism and colonialism, language pedagogy, theory and practice of translation, and the history of Japanese sinology.

Abstract: The Poetics of Suspension in Omoidasu koto nado (1910)


Livia Monnet

Livia Monnet

Professor of Comparative Literature, Film and Japanese Studies, University of Montreal, Canada
Panel: The Heart in the Machine

Livia Monnet is Professor of Comparative Literature, Film and Japanese Studies at the University of Montreal, Canada. Her publications appear in Mechademia, Japan Forum, Études germaniques, Science Fiction Studies, and other peer-reviewed journals, as well as in various anthologies. She is currently completing two book manuscripts: one on emergence in contemporary media installations: and a study of science and embodiment in contemporary screendance.

Abstract: Affect and the Architectural Body in Studio Madhouse’s Anime Adaptation of Sōseki's Kokoro


Shigemi Nakagawa

Shigemi Nakagawa

Professor and Dean of Graduate Studies, Ristumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan
Panel: The Heart in the Machine

Shigemi Nakagawa is Professor and Dean of Graduate Studies at Ristumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan. He is the author of Modaniti no sôzôryoku: Bungaku to shikakusei (Modernity's Imagination: Literature and Visuality, Shinyosha, 2009) and Katarikakeru kioku: Bungaku to jendâ studizu (The Speaking Memory: Literature and Gender Studies, Ozawa shoten, 1999).

Abstract: The Queer Desires in the Film Kokoro by Ichikawa Kon


Daniel O’Neill

Daniel O'Neill

Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Sōseki Translating the World and the World Translating Sōseki

Dan O’Neill is an Associate Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of California at Berkeley. He earned his B.A. from Stanford University in Modern Thought and Literature and Ph.D. from Yale University in Japanese literature. His research interests include the novel in the context of global modernisms and colonial modernity, critical theory (in relation to affect), genre cinema and new media.


Stephen Poland

Stephen Poland

PhD Candidate, Yale University
Panel: Sōseki and Asia

A native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Stephen Poland is a Ph.D. candidate at Yale University, where he is currently working on his dissertation "State of Precarity: Manchukuo and the Question of National Literature and Cinema." The dissertation examines literary and film production in Northeast China under Japanese rule, focusing on how notions of the national were deployed, explored, opposed, and re-imagined through these two important cultural industries of capitalist modernity. Stephen earned his M.A. in Modern Japanese Literature in 2009 from the University of Washington in Seattle, and it was there that he first became interested in how literature intersects with issues of imperialism, capitalism, and nation formation in East Asia. Stephen received his B.A. in Philosophy from Grinnell College in 2002.

Abstract: I Am a Dog: Natsume Sōseki and the South Manchuria Railway


Lisa Reade

Lisa Reade

PhD candidate, Japanese literature, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Asymptotic Intimacies

Lisa Reade received her BA in English from Wesleyan University, and joined the East Asian Languages and Cultures department at Berkeley in 2011. She is now a PhD candidate in Japanese literature with a designated emphasis in Critical Theory, and is broadly interested in the intersection between the natural sciences and the novel. Her MA thesis considers the concept of heredity in Natsume Sōseki's Kokoro, arguing that the novel offers an alternative model for the transmission of experience vis-a-vis the decline of Lamarckianism around the turn of the 20th century. Other interests include the history of Rangaku, particularly the botanical voyages of Engelbert Kaempfer and Phillip Franz von Siebold, the essays of Iwai Katsuhito, and the history of psychoanalysis.

Abstract: Heredity and the Transmission of Experience in Natsume Sōseki’s Kokoro


James Reichert

James Reichert

Associate Professor of Japanese Literature, Stanford University
Panel: Sōseki's Narratology

James Reichert is currently an Associate Professor of Japanese Literature at Stanford University. His publications include In the Company of Men: Representations of Male-Male Sexuality in Meiji Literature (Stanford University Press, 2006) and “Disciplining the Erotic-Grotesque in Edogawa Ranpo’s Demon of the Lonely Isle” in The Culture of Japanese Fascism (Duke University Press, 2009). Currently he is working on a book manuscript that considers the cultural and material significance over the course of the nineteenth century of Kyokutei Bakin’s masterpiece The Tale of the Eight Dogs of the Satomi Clan. The study will focus particularly on how mediation through multiple forms of print technology and book genres affected the meaning of the text and the way that readers engaged with it at different historical moments and in varied social environments.

Abstract: She Had It Coming: Morality and Narrative Voice in Gubijinsō


Atsuko Sakaki

Atsuko Sakaki

Professor, East Asian Studies and Comparative Literature, University of Toronto
Panel: Sōseki's Narratology

Atsuko Sakaki is Professor in East Asian Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. She recently published “The Face in the Shadow of the Camera: Corporeality of the Photographer in Kanai Mieko’s Narratives,” Mechademia 7 (Fall 2012), “Waves from Opposing Shores: Exchanges in a Classical Language in the Age of Nationalism” in Sino-Japanese Transculturation (Lexington Books, 2012), "Tanizaki Jun'ichirō, or Photography as Violence," Japan Forum (2010), and "Taming of the Strange: Arakida Rei Reads and Writes Stories of the Supernatural," in The Female as Subject (Michigan, 2010). The author of Obsessions with Sino-Japanese Polarity in Japanese Literature (Hawai’i, 2005) and Recontextualizing Text: Narrative Performance in Modern Japanese Fiction (Harvard, 1999), and translator/editor of The Woman with the Flying Head and Other Stories by Kurahashi Yumiko (M.E. Sharpe, 1998), she currently works on “Photographic Rhetoric in Modern Japanese Fiction” and translation of short stories by Horie Toshiyuki.


Kristin Sivak

Kristin Sivak

University of Toronto
Panel: Sōseki's Narratology

Kristin Sivak is a PhD student studying modern Japanese literature in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. Her research interests range from issues of narrative theory to comparative literature, and her current work focuses on the history and dynamics of Russo-Japanese literary relations.

Abstract:Device or Character?: Sōseki’s Servants and Narrative Construction


Alan Tansman

Alan Tansman

Director, Townsend Center for the Humanities, University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Asymptotic Intimacies

Alan Tansman is the author of  The Writings of Kōda Aya (Yale) and The Aesthetics of Japanese Fascism (California). He has edited The Culture of of Japanese Fascism (Duke) and co-edited of Studies in Modern Japanese Literature, as well as the forthcoming Tokyo as an Idea: Isoda Kōichi's Essays on Literature and Space (California). He is completing an Oxford Very Short Introduction, Japanese Literature, and is writing a book comparing Japanese and Jewish responses to atrocity. He is Director of Berkeley's Townsend Center for the Humanities, and a member of the journal, Representations, which he co-edited for two years.


Christophe Thouny

Christophe Thouny

Tokyo University
Panel: Sōseki's [Dis]orientations

Christophe Thouny studied at Hitotsubashi University in the Faculty of Sociology before starting a PhD in the Department of East Asian Studies at New York University where he specialized in Japanese studies, focusing in particular the question of modern urban dwelling experiences in Japan. His field of interest covers East Asian urban culture, narrativity and visuality in urban subcultures, urban theory, image theory, and ecocriticism. Now teaching at Tokyo University, his present research projects follow three thematics, cartographic practices of urban space in Meiji and Taishō Tokyo, allegories of the neo-liberal city in contemporary Japanese subculture, and Post-Fukushima Japan and the urban planetary.

Abstract: At the Periphery of the I-Novel: Topologies of the Planetary in Sōseki and Ōgai


Robert Tuck

Assistant Professor of Japanese, University of Montana
Panel: A Three Cornered World

Robert Tuck is Assistant Professor of Japanese at the University of Montana, where he teaches Japanese language, literature and history. He holds a PhD from Columbia University (2012), and his research interests focus on 19th and 20th century Japanese poetry (especially kanshi and haiku), print media, and modes of literary education. He is currently working on a book project analyzing the relationship among poetry, print media, and ideas of national language and literature during the late 19th century.

Abstract: "Shadowed form of Woman:" Gender Ambiguity, Homosocial Poetry, and Kusamakura


Dennis Washburn

Dennis Washburn

Jane and Raphael Bernstein Professor, Asian Studies, Dartmouth College
Panel: Sōseki Translating the World and the World Translating Sōseki

Dennis Washburn is the Jane and Raphael Bernstein Professor in Asian Studies at Dartmouth College. His publications include The Dilemma of the Modern in Japanese Fiction and Translating Mount Fuji: Modern Japanese Fiction and the Ethics of Identity as well as numerous articles. He has also co-edited several volumes, including Word and Image in Japanese Cinema and Converting Cultures: Religion, Ideology, and Transformations of Modernity. In addition to his scholarly work, he has translated several works of modern Japanese fiction, including Tsushima Yuko's Laughing Wolf and Mizukami Tsutomu's The Temple of the Wild Geese, for which he received the 2008 US-Japan Friendship Commission Prize. He recently finished a new translation and annotation of Murasaki Shikibu's The Tale of Genji, which is forthcoming from W. W. Norton, and is currently co-editing a volume of essays titled The Affect of Difference, which deals with representations of race under Japanese empire.

Abstract: Sōseki, the Visual Arts, and the Translation of Subjectivity


Jing Wang

Jing Wang

Ph.D. candidate, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
Panel: Sōseki and Asia

Jing Wang is a PhD candidate in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. She is currently working on the relationship between urban space and modern Japanese literature in the early 20th century. She received her B.A. in Chinese Language and Literature and M.A. in Comparative Literature from Tsinghua University (Beijing).

Abstract: Colonial Spaces in Natsume Sōseki’s Travels in Manchuria and Korea


Leslie Winston

Leslie Winston

Independent Scholar
Panel: Sōseki's [Dis]orientations

Leslie Winston's main research interests include sexuality, modernism, and literary and visual arts and aesthetics. She is writing a book manuscript entitled Spectacular Ambiguity: Subjectivity and the Uses of Intersexuality in Meiji-Taishō Japan. Her publications include “The Voice of Sex and the Sex of Voice in Higuchi Ichiyō and Shimizu Shikin,” in The Linguistic Turn in Contemporary Japanese Literary Studies: Politics, Language, Textuality, ed. and intro. Michael Bourdaghs (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies, 2010); “Performing the Hermaphrodite: Counter-Discourse to Gender Dimorphism in Tokuda Shûsei’s Arakure (Rough Living, 1915),” in PostGender: Gender, Sexuality and Performativity in Japanese Culture (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2009); and ““Beyond Modern: Shimizu Shikin and ‘Two Modern Girls’” and translation of “Two Modern Girls” (Tōsei futari musume, 1897) by Shimizu Shikin Critical Asian Studies. (39.3) September 2007.

Abstract: Modernity, Boredom, and Decadence in Natsume Sōseki’s Sorekara


Angela Yiu

Angela Yiu

Director, Monumenta Nipponica Institute, Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan
Panel: Soseki Translating the World and the World Translating Sōseki

Angela Yiu received her B.A. in Comparative Literature and Asian Studies from Cornell University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Literatures from Yale University. At Yale, she studied Modern Japanese Literature, and her first book was titled Chaos and Order in the Works of Natsume Sōseki. Her current research interests include modernism, utopian studies, postwar literature, colonial literature, urban studies, and women writers. She has been teaching in Japan for over twenty years, and since 1999, she teaches Japanese literature in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Graduate School of Global Studies at Sophia University in Tokyo. Currently, she serves as the Institute Director of Monumenta Nipponica at Sophia University. Her recent publication is titled Three-Dimensional Reading: Stories of Time and Space in Japanese Modernist Literature, 1911-1932.

Abstract: Sōseki Translating China


Hitomi Yoshio

Hitomi Yoshio

Assistant Professor of Japanese, Florida International University
Panel: A Three Cornered World

Hitomi Yoshio is an Assistant Professor of Japanese at Florida International University with a joint appointment in Modern Languages and Asian Studies. She specializes in 19th and 20th century Japanese literature and culture, and is currently working on a book manuscript titled Envisioning Women Writers: Female Authorship and the Cultures of Publishing and Translation in Early 20th Century Japan. Her research interests include the formation of the modern literary field in Japan, relationship between gender and writing, history of translation, canon formation, and the study of literary histories. Hitomi Yoshio received her B.A. from Yale (2001), M.A. from the University of Tokyo (2005), and Ph.D. from Columbia (2012).

Abstract: The Art of Forgetting: National Literature, Authorship, and Gender in Kusamakura (1906)