Conference Organizers

Alan Tansman

Alan Tansman

Director, Townsend Center for the Humanities, University of California, Berkeley
Panel: Asymptotic Intimacies

Alan Tansman is the author of  The Writings of Kōda Aya (Yale) and The Aesthetics of Japanese Fascism (California). He has edited The Culture of of Japanese Fascism (Duke) and co-edited of Studies in Modern Japanese Literature, as well as the forthcoming Tokyo as an Idea: Isoda Kōichi's Essays on Literature and Space (California). He is completing an Oxford Very Short Introduction, Japanese Literature, and is writing a book comparing Japanese and Jewish responses to atrocity. He is Director of Berkeley's Townsend Center for the Humanities, and a member of the journal, Representations, which he co-edited for two years.


J. Keith Vincent

Keith Vincent

Associate Professor, Japanese and Comparative Literature, Boston University

J. Keith Vincent is the author of Two-Timing Modernity: Homosocial Narrative in Modern Japanese Fiction (Harvard Asia Center, 2012). Recent edited volumes include Honoring Eve, a Spring 2010 issue of Criticism, co-edited with Erin Murphy, on the work of queer theorist Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Perversion and Modern Japan: Psychoanalysis, Literature, Culture, (Routledge, 2010) co-edited with Nina Cornyetz. His translation of Okamoto Kanoko's A Riot of Goldfish (Hesperus 2010) won the 2011 U.S. Japan Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature. He was also part of the team that translated Natsume Sōseki's Theory of Literature (Columbia UP 2009). He is Associate Professor of Japanese and Comparative Literature at Boston University and is in residence for the current academic year at the University of Michigan as the Toyota Visiting Professor of Japanese Studies. He is currently at work on a book on shaseibun, with a focus on Sōseki’s early work.


Jonathan Zwicker

Jonathan Zwicker

Associate Professor, Japanese literature; Director of the Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan

Jonathan Zwicker is Associate Professor of Japanese literature and Director of the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Practices of the Sentimental Imagination: Melodrama, the Novel, and the Social Imaginary in Nineteenth-Century Japan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Asia Center, 2006) and his work on the Japanese novel has appeared in The Novel: History, Geography, and Culture (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of the Novel and Novel Criticism (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2011), and Versants: revue suisse des littératures romanes (2011). He is currently completing a book titled “Stage and Spectacle in an Age of Print: Drama and Cultural Consumption in Nineteenth-Century Edo” which examines the intersection of kabuki and print culture in the nineteenth century.