HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Section: 004 Nationalism in Modern Europe: Identity, Difference, Power
Term: FA 2007
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Other Course Info:
This course may not be included in a History concentration. F.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

What is a nation? How are nations formed? Who is included in and excluded from national communities, and how? This course studies the emergence of nationalism as a powerful political and cultural force in modern European history.

Since the topic of the formation of individual nation-states is vast, this writing-intensive course will not present a survey of European nationalisms; instead, it will explore several central themes of nationalism through three specific historical cases and through discussion of the defining issues in the history of nationalism: formation of national identities, dynamics of collective political action, patterns of inclusion/exclusion from national communities, and the problem of ethnocentric prejudice and nationalist violence. The course will begin with the consideration of everyday encounters with patriotism and other “national issues” before proceeding to examine how scholars have historically situated nationalism, especially in the context of the formation of nation-states in modern Europe. Part II will then focus on three case studies of the development of nationalism: Ireland, Poland, and the Yugoslav nations. On one hand, this part will provide contrasting historical studies that afford keener insights into different dynamics of national movements. On the other hand, the thematic overlap between these three cases will also enable comparison and analysis of shared historical issues relating the problem of nationalism. Part III follows the development of nationalism in 20th- and 21st-century Europe. This part will critically examine the devastating impact of nationalist violence in the 20th century before turning to the place of nation-states in a world increasingly dominated by larger global flows and transnational influences. Finally, we will reflect on different nationalist conceptions of community and examine possible alternatives to the nationalist models.

While we, as a class, will analyze the above historical issues, the overall goal of this course is to help students become proficient in different skills needed to interpret, research, and write about historical events and processes. In other words, this is a writing course with a strong emphasis on students’ active engagement with class discussions and assignments. The topic and the structure of the course are geared toward introduction and gradual development of various writing skills through a series of course activities detailed in the class schedule.

HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
12544
Open
1
2Y1
4Enrollment Management
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Note: ALL SECTIONS OF HISTORY 195 ARE RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.
002 (REC)
P
12545
Open
1
1Y1
4Enrollment Management
-
TuF 1:00PM - 2:30PM
004 (REC)
P
12547
Open
1
2Y1
4Enrollment Management
-
WF 4:00PM - 5:30PM
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