ANTHRCUL 461 - Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America
Section: 001
Term: WN 2008
Subject: Anthropology, Cultural (ANTHRCUL)
Department: LSA Anthropology
Credits:
3
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages. We will focus on topics such as the relationship between language and landscape, oral narratives, language and thought, dominant/subordinate language contact situations, sign language, and literacy. No special background is required, but students should have upper-level or graduate student status. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in discussions, three short book reviews, a mid-term exam, and a paper on a topic related to the course.

ANTHRCUL 461 - Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
27725
Open
1
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
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