ENVIRON 160 - Habitats and Organisms: Terrestrial Ecosystems
Section: 001
Term: WN 2008
Subject: Program in the Environment (ENVIRON)
Department: LSA Environment
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
BS, NS
BS:
This course counts toward the 60 credits of math/science required for a Bachelor of Science degree.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Introduces students to fundamental principles of terrestrial ecology and ecosystem management. Gives examples of common habitats in North America, emphasizing the vegetative components. Another focus is on various types of organisms that comprise these terrestrial communities. Finally, examines current threats to the health of terrestrial ecosystems and challenges present in ecosystem management.

The lecture component will introduce students to the fundamental principles of terrestrial ecology through four thematic areas: Basic Concepts, Organisms, Habitats and Ecosystems, and Key Issues in Ecosystem Management. The first thematic area, Basic Concepts, introduces students to important foundation ideas in ecology through case studies of current, prominent issues such as the Healthy Forest Initiative and oil development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Ideas covered in this section include definitions of important terms such as species and habitat, descriptions of biomes, importance of photosynthesis, productivity, nutrient cycling, energy flow, and change in ecosystems such as succession, recruitment, and disturbance. In the second thematic area, Organisms, we discuss biodiversity and the infinite variety of life on earth. Specific examples include white-tailed deer populations in Michigan, the incredible diversity of structure and function in insects, and biology and ecology of aspen — which is the world’s largest organism due to its clonal nature. Habitats and Ecosystems, the third thematic area, emphasizes habitats of North America, along with stressing the importance of the vegetative component of habitats and ecosystems. The final thematic area, Key Issues in Ecosystem Management, examines current threats to the health of terrestrial ecosystems and the challenges presented in ecosystem management. The discussion component is a hands-on experiential learning setting for the students. It concentrates on critical thinking skills; exercises such as tree measurements, mapping, and designing a space in the urban landscape; and focused discussions on organisms, habitats, ecosystems, and management situations.

Three exams comprise 55% of the course grade; nine discussion section exercises comprise 35% of the course grade; participation comprises 10% of the course grade.

ENVIRON 160 - Habitats and Organisms: Terrestrial Ecosystems
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
22464
Open
2
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:00PM
002 (DIS)
P
22465
Closed
0
 
-
Th 2:00PM - 4:00PM
003 (DIS)
P
22466
Open
2
 
-
Th 4:00PM - 6:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
27445
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 4:00PM - 6:00PM
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