ANTHRBIO 161 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Section: 001
Term: FA 2008
Subject: Anthropology, Biological (ANTHRBIO)
Department: LSA Anthropology
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
BS, NS
Other Course Info:
Does not count toward Anthropology concentration requirements. F, W, Su.
BS:
This course counts toward the 60 credits of math/science required for a Bachelor of Science degree.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course will examine the evolutionary foundations of human variability. For this purpose, the course will address the principles of human evolution, fossil evidence, behavior, and morphological characteristics of human and non-human primates. In addition, human inter-population differences and environmental factors that account for these differences will be evaluated. To accomplish this goal the lectures include multimedia information derived from film clips, slides, overhead illustrations, etc. During class, each student is expected to participate actively in the development of all the topics.

The lectures include multimedia information derived from film clips, Power Point lectures along with the resources given in Ctools, etc. This course will examine the evolutionary foundations of human past and present variability. The contents of this course are divided into four interrelated parts.

  1. PART I. EVOLUTIONARY ROOTS. Focuses on:
    1. The history of the development evolutionary theory from the theological phase to the scientific phase of Darwin and Mendel and how it became incorporated into the practice of anthropology;
    2. The basic principles of cell biology including the principles of cellular and molecular genetics, Mendelian genetics of dominant and recessive discontinuous traits, sex linked recessive genes, autosomal traits, and inheritance of continuous traits; and
    3. The application of Mendelian and population genetics to study the process of microevolution learned from observation and experimental studies of variability in animals and humans.
  2. PART II. MACRO-EVOLUTION. This section examines:
    1. The roots of mammalian evolution beginning with the successful evolutionary adaptation of mammals that gave rise to the primates;
    2. The variability and ecological adaptations of living primates;
    3. The fossil evidence of the evolution of primates from their initial appearance to extant primates;
    4. The role of food on the evolution of the primate omnivore digestive system.
  3. PART III. HOMINID EVOLUTION. This section evaluates the fossil evidence of hominid evolution including:
    1. Evolution from the earliest hominoid-hominids to the anatomically modern Homo sapiens;
    2. Peopling of the New World and hypothesis about the origin of the anatomically modern Homo sapiens;
    3. Role of food on the evolution of human brain size; and
    4. and the effects of bipedalism on childbirth and altricial development on the evolution of parental behavior of humans.
  4. PART IV. HUMAN ADAPTATION AND BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY. This part addressed the bio-cultural processes whereby humans have adapted to their current and past environments. It includes reviews of:
    1. Current views about human variability with reference to the concept of race and the general principles for the study of human adaptation;
    2. The general characteristics of the life cycle and the influence of nutritional factors;
    3. The physiological adaptive responses of contemporary population to hot and cold climates and the variability in body size and proportions in reference to climatic factors among contemporary and past populations;
    4. the biological adaptation to high altitude environments;
    5. the bio-cultural origins of individual and population differences in lactose digestibility and evolution of skin color; and
    6. How humans are responding to the new and changing world environment, and the factors associated with globalization trend of obesity.

ANTHRBIO 161 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
11036
Open
32
 
-
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
Note: DISCUSSION SECTIONS BEGIN MEETING AFTER THE FIRST LECTURE. STUDENTS ENROLLED IN DIS SECTION WILL BE AUTO-ENROLLED IN THE LEC.
002 (DIS)
P
11037
Open
3
 
-
M 10:00AM - 11:00AM
003 (DIS)
P
11038
Open
2
 
-
M 11:00AM - 12:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
11039
Open
4
 
-
Tu 10:00AM - 11:00AM
005 (DIS)
P
11040
Open
1
 
-
Tu 11:00AM - 12:00PM
006 (DIS)
P
11041
Open
1
 
-
Tu 2:00PM - 3:00PM
007 (DIS)
P
11042
Open
3
4LSA Hnrs
-
W 10:00AM - 11:00AM
008 (DIS)
P
28092
Closed
0
 
-
W 11:00AM - 12:00PM
009 (DIS)
P
28093
Closed
0
 
-
W 2:00PM - 3:00PM
010 (DIS)
P
28094
Open
9
 
-
Th 10:00AM - 11:00AM
011 (DIS)
P
30991
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 12:00PM - 1:00PM
012 (DIS)
P
30992
Open
1
 
-
Tu 1:00PM - 2:00PM
013 (DIS)
P
30993
Open
13
 
-
W 5:00PM - 6:00PM
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