CLCIV 376 - Emperors of Rome
Section: 001
Term: FA 2008
Subject: Classical Civilization (CLCIV)
Department: LSA Classical Studies
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
ULWR, HU
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course examines the literary and artistic evidence for the ways that the Romans conceived of their system of government between Julius Caesar and Theodosius. Readings include select works of Caesar, Suetonius, Cassius Dio, Tacitus, Marcus Aurelius, Eusebius (Life of Constantine), speeches in praise of emperors (Pliny's Panegyric and select speeches from the Latin Panegyrics), Ammianus Marcellinus, and some of the writings of the emperor Julian, including his Caesars and his Letter to the Athenians.

The course is divided into four main sections: 1) "Defining the emperor" and concentrating on the period from Caesar to Augustus; 2) "Refining the emperor" looks at the Julio-Claudian Dynasty after Augustus; 3) "Working with the emperor" which will focus on the emperors of the second century AD; and 4) "Christianizing the emperor" dealing with Constantine, Julian, Valentinian I, and Theodosius I. Student will be expected to write five 2-page response papers and two 10-page papers. At least two papers must take as their theme major monuments such as: the forum of Augustus (2 pg); the Sebasteion at Aphrodisias (2 pg); Comparison between the columns of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius (10 pg); the arch of Constantine (10 pg). At least two papers must consider a major work on the nature of the imperial system such as: Tacitus' portrayal of either Tiberius or Nero; Tacitus' account of the Civil War of AD 69; Cassius Dio's "debate" on the imperial system; Marcus Aurelius' understanding of power; Ammianus Marcellinus' portrait of Julian contrasted with Eusebius' portrait of Constantine (topics for 10-page papers); Suetonius' judgment on the assassination of Caesar; Tacitus account of Augustus; the role of Caesar the Spanish War; the death of Germanicus; and Ammianus on Valentinian (topics for 2-page papers).

it introduces students to ancient theories of government (in this case monarchy, by far the most common form of government in antiquity), across a broad timeframe (350 years). The course offers students a broad based introduction to the methods of ancient history, the different source material, the way that sources are used and analyzed (especially class and cultural biases in the construction of ancient narratives, and the canons of imperial art). Since the essential issue in this course is how the most successful super power in the ancient world worked (and where it failed), the topic is relevant to any students interested in how great powers work.

Intended audience: Primarily juniors and seniors wishing to fulfill the upper-level writing requirement and students who have some interest in learning more about the Roman world.

Course Requirements: 30 pages of writing described in more detail above (five 2-page response papers and two 10-page papers) and two hourly examinations.

Class Format: Three 1-hr lectures weekly and one hour discussion section per week.

CLCIV 376 - Emperors of Rome
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
27682
Open
23
 
-
MWF 1:00PM - 2:00PM
002 (DIS)
P
27683
Open
11
 
-
M 10:00AM - 11:00AM
003 (DIS)
P
27684
Closed
0
 
-
M 2:00PM - 3:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
27685
Open
2
 
-
M 3:00PM - 4:00PM
006 (DIS)
P
27687
Open
1
 
-
Tu 12:00PM - 1:00PM
007 (DIS)
P
27688
Open
7
 
-
Tu 4:00PM - 5:00PM
009 (DIS)
P
27690
Open
2
 
-
W 2:00PM - 3:00PM
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