COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Section: 002 Telling Stories: Metamorphoses and Reflections
Term: FA 2008
Subject: Comparative Literature (COMPLIT)
Department: LSA Comparative Literature
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Waitlist Capacity:
100
Cost:
0
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

"The world isn't just the way it is. It is how we understand it, no? And in understanding something, we bring something to it, no? Doesn't that make life a story?" (Life of Pi, Yann Martel)

The history of literature is filled with moments of magical transformation, of animals becoming human and humans, animal, of the inanimate being given the power of speech, and of the world itself becoming unworldly. These moments cannot be said to belong to a genre of realism, properly speaking, and it is easy to dismiss these stories as belonging to a "mythic" time, or to enclose them in an aberrant genre (surrealism or magical realism, for example). Yet despite our propensity to want to distinguish between "truth" and "fiction," and our desire in general to elevate facts over everything else, these "mythic" stories can often hold the greatest attraction for our minds, can become the guiding lights for our understanding of life. In some cases the best storytelling doesn't necessarily reflect reality, nor does it meet our expectations, but often challenges us to reconfigure the way we approach the world, to pay attention to the ways in which we subjectify the world before it even becomes real to us.

This course will trace the development of the figure of metamorphosis from ancient Rome to contemporary Latin America. We will be looking at how the idea of metamorphosis has evolved and been translated into various cultural contexts. In the same vein, we will also be following the use of mirrors, reflections and uncanny doubling in poetry and short stories. Readings will include selections from Ovid, Nikolai Gogol's "The Nose," Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, E.T.A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman," and short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and Julio Cortázar.

This course is designed to help you develop your analytical skills, both as a reader and a writer, and to further your knowledge of literature and other artistic forms.

COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
20065
Closed
0
 
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MWF 9:00AM - 10:00AM
002 (REC)
P
20066
Closed
0
 
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MWF 11:00AM - 12:00PM
003 (REC)
P
22241
Open
1
 
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TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
004 (REC)
P
25072
Open
1
 
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TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
005 (REC)
P
29437
Open
2
 
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TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
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