HONORS 135 - Ideas in Honors
Section: 007 Humanitarian Aid in Africa: Crisis or Cause for Celebration
Term: FA 2008
Subject: Honors Program (HONORS)
Department: LSA Honors
Credits:
1
Other:
Honors, Minicourse
Class Misc Info:
Meets 9/17-11/5. (Drop/Add deadline=09/30/08)..
Advisory Prerequisites:
First-year standing in the Honors Program.
Grading:
Mandatory credit/no credit.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Class meets Sept. 17, 24, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 29, Nov. 5

This mini-course is designed to take a critical approach towards the dominant paradigm of poverty reduction through the giving of international aid to Third World countries, particularly those in Africa. Poverty reduction, on the very most surface level, sounds like the ideal humanitarian project. ‘Poverty,’ it is widely agreed, is a societal evil that should be eradicated, while ‘reduction’ has a particularly proactive connotation, often associated with the distribution of aid to Third World countries. However, as a development strategy, poverty reduction has been far from ideal. Poverty reduction aid, provided increasingly by bilateral and multilateral donors and channeled through non-governmental development organizations (NGDOs), has mainly served as a ‘global soup kitchen.’ This system is far from sustainable and almost entirely lacking in true economic or human development while often fostering donor paternalism and recipient dependency, allowing for internal organizational inefficiencies, and advancing the questionable motives of donors. Of course there are NGDOs who have deviated from this pattern and we will look at those as well. However, one thing appears to be certain: there are going to be considerable changes in the international aid landscape in the near future. Declining aid from public and private sources is causing many NGDOs to rethink the aid paradigm as it stands, and to reconsider their own roles within it. However, it appears that this ‘aid crisis’ may actually present an opportunity for improvement, as NGDOs could be forced to evolve into more efficient entities refocused on their institutional roles and organizational aims or else fall off the map entirely. In this course we will look at the pros and cons of international humanitarian aid, focusing on a number of case studies from throughout Africa. These subjects will be approached from a multidisciplinary standpoint and much of the material will come not only from scholarly journals, but also from case studies and real life experience. No prior knowledge of development economics or African politics is necessary.

HONORS 135 - Ideas in Honors
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
19531
Closed
0
1LSA Hnrs Y1
-
M 4:00PM - 5:00PM
Note: note:
002 (SEM)
P
22627
Open
2
2LSA Hnrs Y1
-
Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
Note: note:
003 (SEM)
P
19532
Closed
0
 
-
M 4:00PM - 5:00PM
Note: note:
004 (SEM)
P
19533
Open
1
1LSA Hnrs Y1
-
Tu 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: note:
005 (SEM)
P
20479
Open
3
3LSA Hnrs Y1
-
M 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Note: note:
006 (SEM)
P
20488
Open
4
4LSA Hnrs Y1
-
W 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Note: note:
007 (SEM)
P
21567
Open
3
4LSA Hnrs Y1
-
W 6:00PM - 7:00PM
Note: note:
008 (SEM)
P
22628
Closed
0
 
-
F 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Note: note:
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