RCCORE 100 - First Year Seminar
Section: 013 "Is That You, Stanley?" Exploration Narratives and Their Creators
Term: FA 2008
Subject: RC Core Courses (RCCORE)
Department: LSA Residential College
Course Note:
Enrollment in RCCORE 100 is limited to incoming Residential College students.
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Advisory Prerequisites:
SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

As we drew nearer the land, I hailed with delight the appearance of innumerable sea-fowl. Screaming and whirling in spiral tracks, they would accompany the vessel, and at times alight on our yards and stays. That piratical-looking fellow, appropriately named the man-of-war's hawk, with his blood-red bill and raven plumage, would come sweeping round us in gradually diminishing circles, till you could distinctly mark the strange flashings of his eye; and then, as if satisfied with his observation, would sail up into the air and disappear from view. Soon other evidences of our vicinity to the land were apparent, and it was not long before the glad announcement of its being in sight was heard from aloft, given with that peculiar prolongation of sound that a sailor loves "Land ho!" (Melville, Typee 10).

This seminar will explore the genre of exploration narratives and the adventurers who popularized them. Exploration narratives recorded scientific, economic, and cultural information; they also functioned as personal narratives of the discovery of strange and exotic lands and people. The narratives were popular vehicles of information for a public hungry for new ideas. That the narrator was familiar to the audience made the narratives more appealing, as it allowed a general public the vicarious pleasure of exploring new lands.
Reading practices, too, helped a general public explore this genre, as shifts in literacy rates and the rise of public libraries contributed to a wide dissemination of these texts. The genre also gave rise to a new breed of travel writer: the renegade. Previously the domain of upper-class Europeans, the literary period widely titled the "Grand Tour" gave way to those intrepid writers who jumped ship, ran away, were marooned, or taken captive. These writers not only flaunted conventionality in their narratives, they frequently embellished their tales in order to satisfy a demanding public.

Texts may include:

  • William Beckford, The Gentleman's Pocket Companion for
  • Travelling into Foreign Parts
  • Isabella Bird, The Englishwoman in America
  • Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
  • Jane Robinson, Wayward Women
  • William Shackleton, South
  • John Hanning Speke, The Discovery of the Source of the Nile
  • Henry Morton Stanley, My Early Travels and Adventures in America and Asia
  • Herman Melville, Typee
Assorted maps accessed at The Map Library; Hatcher Graduate Library

RCCORE 100 - First Year Seminar
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
15329
Open
1
1RC Ugrd
-
MTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
002 (SEM)
P
15330
Open
4
4RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 2:00PM - 3:30PM
003 (SEM)
P
16796
Open
1
 
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 5:00PM
004 (SEM)
P
18187
Open
3
3RC Ugrd
-
MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
005 (SEM)
P
18188
Open
5
5RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
006 (SEM)
P
18189
Closed
0
 
-
Th 11:00AM - 1:00PM
Tu 11:00AM - 1:00PM
007 (SEM)
P
18190
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
M 7:00PM - 9:00PM
008 (SEM)
P
18191
Open
2
2RC Ugrd
-
MW 11:00AM - 12:30PM
009 (SEM)
P
18192
Open
3
3RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
010 (SEM)
P
18193
Closed
0
1RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
011 (SEM)
P
24868
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
012 (SEM)
P
21400
Open
1
2RC Ugrd
-
MW 3:00PM - 4:30PM
013 (SEM)
P
28216
Open
8
 
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
014 (SEM)
P
20107
Open
3
3RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
016 (SEM)
P
23908
Open
2
2RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
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