RCCORE 100 - First Year Seminar
Section: 014 Swing to the Right: the Evolution of American Politics Since the 1960s
Term: FA 2008
Subject: RC Core Courses (RCCORE)
Department: LSA Residential College
Course Note:
Enrollment in RCCORE 100 is limited to incoming Residential College students.
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Advisory Prerequisites:
SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

By worldwide standards the Left has never been very strong in the United States, but in the 1960s the political pendulum appeared to be shifting to the Left. The Kennedy and Johnson administrations pursued policies that sought to enhance the role of the state in improving the lot of the less fortunate and in protecting people from adverse effects of market forces. Moreover, a variety of non-governmental movements gained strength as they sought to combat evils perceived to characterize American capitalism – such as poverty, racism, sexism, militarism, and environmental deterioration. Since the 1960s, however, the trend in U.S. politics has been unmistakably to the Right. Both of the major parties have espoused policies that reduce the role of the state, that give more play to the free market, and that call upon individuals to take more responsibility for their own fate. Moreover, Left-wing social and political movements are weaker and less influential than in the past.
In this seminar we will seek to understand some of the key forces that have accompanied and may well have contributed to this major shift in the U.S. political climate. We will consider trends and developments over the past five decades in a variety of spheres that arguably have an important influence on U.S. politics – such as accelerating globalization, rising concentration of media ownership, and changing religious practices across the United States. We will also examine the growth of a variety of powerful Right-wing movements. Like all RC first-year seminars, this one will involve a substantial amount of reading, discussion and – most importantly – writing.

RCCORE 100 - First Year Seminar
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
15329
Open
1
1RC Ugrd
-
MTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
002 (SEM)
P
15330
Open
4
4RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 2:00PM - 3:30PM
003 (SEM)
P
16796
Open
1
 
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 5:00PM
004 (SEM)
P
18187
Open
3
3RC Ugrd
-
MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
005 (SEM)
P
18188
Open
5
5RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
006 (SEM)
P
18189
Closed
0
 
-
Th 11:00AM - 1:00PM
Tu 11:00AM - 1:00PM
007 (SEM)
P
18190
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
M 7:00PM - 9:00PM
008 (SEM)
P
18191
Open
2
2RC Ugrd
-
MW 11:00AM - 12:30PM
009 (SEM)
P
18192
Open
3
3RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
010 (SEM)
P
18193
Closed
0
1RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
011 (SEM)
P
24868
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
012 (SEM)
P
21400
Open
1
2RC Ugrd
-
MW 3:00PM - 4:30PM
013 (SEM)
P
28216
Open
8
 
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
014 (SEM)
P
20107
Open
3
3RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
016 (SEM)
P
23908
Open
2
2RC Ugrd
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 4:30PM
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