AMCULT 301 - Topics in American Culture
Section: 002 Public Poetry
Term: WN 2009
Subject: American Culture (AMCULT)
Department: LSA American Culture
Credits:
3
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Repeatability:
May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.
Primary Instructor:

This course explores the poetry of public occasions, poetry in public places, and poetry programs and projects. Starting with the poetry of presidential inaugurations, we will compare different definitions of “public” and of “poetry.” Throughout the semester, we will engage in critical reflection on the public value, public claims, and public contexts of poetry. The course will examine poetry as a socially charged aesthetic practice. This means that we will look at how voice, form, and genre work in real time and in material spaces. We will consider how different media make poetry public in diverse ways, for varied publics, and with mixed motives. The media in question may include include broadsides, newspapers, radio (Writer’s Almanac), television (Bill Moyers), theater (Anna Deavere Smith and Sekou Sundiata), the natural, built, or designed environment (Robert Hass’s Berkeley Poetry Project, Poetry in Motion, River of Words), orality (from the Beats and the Black Arts Movement to performance poetry), and the web. The course focuses mostly on poetry in the context of recent forms of cultural production. However, it also demands that students take literary and cultural history seriously. One assignment will focus on close encounters with poetic artifacts in U-M archives and collections. Readings will include many poems and some works of lyric performance viewed on DVD, as well as critical readings Habermas and the Public Sphere (Calhoun, ed.); Counterpublics (Warner), Appropriating Blackness (Johnson), “Sponsors of Literacy” (Brandt), Cool Places: Geographies of Youth Cultures (Skelton and Valentine); Talk to Me (Anna Deavere Smith); Lure of the Local (Lucy Lippard), and essays by Dana Gioia, Ross Talarico, and others. The class will be a reading and writing community. Thus, we will be writing early and often. Assignments will focus on developing a range of critical and writing skills. Assignments include an ethnographic interview with a peer or family member; an archival exercise; a short paper that links a close reading of a poem to one of the assigned essays; critical responses to readings or performance events; a class presentation on a poetry-centered organization, project, or program; and a final paper, developed through a series of drafts refined through peer response. No prerequisites but significant college-level exposure to reading or writing poetry (in any language and of any historical period) is highly recommended

AMCULT 301 - Topics in American Culture
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
25473
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Note: .
002 (REC)
P
24632
Open
8
 
-
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
003 (REC)
P
25472
Open
6
 
-
TuTh 3:00PM - 5:00PM
004 (REC)
P
26354
Open
22
 
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MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
005 (LEC)
 
26461
Open
67
 
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TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
006 (DIS)
P
28060
Closed
0
 
-
Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
008 (DIS)
P
28056
Open
15
 
-
W 10:00AM - 11:00AM
009 (DIS)
P
28057
Open
11
 
-
W 11:00AM - 12:00PM
010 (DIS)
P
28058
Open
4
 
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W 1:00PM - 2:00PM
011 (DIS)
P
28059
Open
7
 
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W 2:00PM - 3:00PM
012 (LEC)
P
31121
Open
2
 
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M 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Note: Section 012 is a 1 credit mini course that meets January 27 through March 9, 2009.
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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