CLCIV 120 - First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section: 001 Africa in the Ancient Literary Imagination
Term: WN 2009
Subject: Classical Civilization (CLCIV)
Department: LSA Classical Studies
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Other:
FYSem, WorldLit
Class Misc Info:
Advisory Prerequisites:
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

‘Something new from Africa’, as Miriam Makeba sang, repeating an ancient proverb first attested in Aristotle. The ancient Greeks were passionate about origins – their heroes (and some of their gods) were often first finders and/or founders. Africa, too, had her share of Greek heroes and gods who first ‘found’ and/or ‘founded’ her, or were born on its territories. This course studies Africa as a natural space, an idea, a geo-political entity – a field of enquiry where we discover what myths, ideas, constructions, biases, preferences or disliking the ancient Greeks and Romans had about Africa. Some of the most fascinating ancient literary texts will take us on an adventurous discovery of the wealth of Africa, but we will also look at ancient, medieval, and early modern African maps, not to mention African flora and fauna, seascape, landscape, peoples, animals, culture, agriculture. In fostering dialogue with ancient classical sources, modern scholars invite us to reflect on what we think we know, that ‘Africa is a continent.’ In our quest for origins, however, we catch the glimpse of a time when Africa was not even considered a continent on its own right. The goal of this course is to gain familiarity with ancient (and modern) constructions of how geographic space becomes an idea around which social, political, economic, as well as positive and negative pre-conceived notions of otherness, continue to cluster.

Readings, all in English, include selections from ancient Greek authors (Herodotus, Aristotle, Strabo, etc.), ancient Roman authors (Pliny the Elder, Seneca the Younger, Lucan, etc.), and modern scholars (e.g., Edward Saïd, Benjamin Isaac, Nicholas Purcell, etc.).

CLCIV 120 - First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
20643
Open
13
13Y1
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


Note:
All textbooks are on reserve and need not be all purchased.
ISBN: 039474067X
Orientalism, Author: Edward W. Said ; [with a new p, Publisher: Vintage Books 25th anniv 2003
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9780140446388
The histories, Author: Herodotus., Publisher: Penguin Books 1996
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9781844673285
The other, Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski ; translat, Publisher: Verso 2008
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0192839497
Civil war, Author: Lucan ; translated with an int, Publisher: Oxford University Press 1999
Optional
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 1400078784
Travels with Herodotus, Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski ; translat, Publisher: Vintage Books 1st Vintag 2008
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0192833006
Agricola and Germany, Author: Tacitus. Translated with an in, Publisher: Oxford University Press 1999
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9780199206582
Geopolitics : a very short introduction, Author: Klaus Dodds., Publisher: Oxford University Press 2007
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9780192802484
African history : a very short introduction, Author: John Parker, Richard Rathbone., Publisher: Oxford University Press 2007
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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