HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Section: 003 Humanitarianism: African Historical Perspectives
Term: FA 2009
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Waitlist Capacity:
10
Other Course Info:
This course may not be included in a History concentration. F.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course examines humanitarianism through African history. By studying encounters between people of European and African descent, we shall consider how humanitarian ideas and practices have formed and developed in the modern world. In the process we will develop historical perspectives on some of the pressing moral questions of our time:

  • What is the idea of humanity conceived and protected by humanitarianism?
  • How does it shape the way in which we understand and relate to poverty, disease, and violence?
  • How may it be used both to ameliorate and perpetuate the suffering of others?
  • How does it compare with human rights and other ideologies we might imagine as a response to global problems?

While studying humanitarianism through African history, students will be introduced to the discipline of history itself. Together, we will examine an array of:

  • secondary sources, including articles and books written by historians and other scholars, and
  • primary sources, including autobiographies, novels, oral testimonies, posters, photographs, and film.

Through discussions and assignments involving this material, students will encounter varying interpretations of the past and be encouraged to develop skills used by historians to evaluate sources and frame arguments.

This course is writing intensive, and writing assignments will be particularly important to the pedagogy of learning history. During the academic term, students will submit 30-45 pages of written material in which they practice the kind of writing that historians do:

  • summarizing the content of sources,
  • comparing sources and evaluating their significance in relation to one another,
  • taking a position in a debate about an historical issue and using sources to develop a persuasive argument which supports a position.

Students will receive feedback on their writing both from the instructor and their classmates and at least 15-18 pages will be developed through revisions into polished prose that uses and cites sources appropriately.

Requirements:

  • Class Participation (12.5%),
  • Reading Responses (12.5%),
  • Expository Essay (25%),
  • Research Paper (50%).

HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
14349
Closed
0
4Y1
6Enrollment Management
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Note: ALL SECTIONS OF HISTORY 195 ARE RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.
002 (REC)
P
14351
Open
2
2Y1
6Enrollment Management
-
TuF 1:00PM - 2:30PM
003 (REC)
P
43043
Open
2
2Y1
6Enrollment Management
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
004 (REC)
P
14353
Open
1
5Y1
-
Tu 2:00PM - 5:00PM
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