HISTORY 197 - First-Year Seminar
Section: 001 Mary and Modernity: A Comparative History of Visionary Experience (1830-Present)
Term: FA 2009
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Course Note:
A basic introduction to historical thinking and method through small-course seminar experience. Topics vary from term to term; however, no matter what the topic, students can expect to spend a great deal of time learning to think critically about historical questions and to write well. As such, the First-Year seminar should serve as an introduction to upper-level course work in history and related fields of study.
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Other:
FYSem
Waitlist Capacity:
10
Advisory Prerequisites:
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

The appearance of the Virgin Mary to Catherine Labouré in Paris in 1830 marks the beginning of what is widely referred to in Catholic circles as the “Age of Mary.” Since then, Marian apparitions have proliferated at a rate unprecedented in the history of Christianity, transforming what was once a phenomenon witnessed by a privileged and pious few into public spectacles, often of a global scale. This course charts this transformation, using apparitions and miracles of the Virgin Mary worldwide as a historical lens through which we may understand several hallmarks of modernity: industrialization, secularism, nationalism, total war, the ascendancy of technology and the mass media, and the feminization of the supernatural. We ask whether miracles and apparitions of the Virgin Mary represent sites of resistance to modern conditions, or are an effect of them. We also examine how modern Marian apparitions have both shaped and reflected gender ideologies held by different cultures where Catholicism has taken root.

This seminar draws on a diversity of material, including primary sources, devotional texts, film, and other popular media. Of methodological concern is how one can read a variety of sources historically. Attendance at all sessions is mandatory, and students are expected to have done all required reading, produce and present weekly response papers, and participate in discussion. Final grades will be determined by the above, plus a final research paper on a relevant topic of the student’s choosing.

HISTORY 197 - First-Year Seminar
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
41755
Open
6
3Y1
-
W 2:00PM - 5:00PM
Note: ALL SECTIONS OF HISTORY 197 ARE RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS. Section 001 Meets with WOMENSTD 150.002
003 (SEM)
P
45297
Open
3
3Y1
-
MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Note: Section 003: "Invisible Cities: Travellers' Tales, 1220-1650 AD."
004 (SEM)
P
48502
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
Note: Section 004: "Say it Loud: Black Culture in America." Meets with AMCULT 103.001 and CAAS 104.001
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 0394711556
Alone of all her sex : the myth and the cult of the Virgin Mary, Author: Marina Warner., Publisher: Vintage Books 1st Vintag 1983
Required
ISBN: 0141038489
Lourdes : body and spirit in the secular age, Author: Ruth Harris., Publisher: Penguin 2008
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0226021505
Internet and Madonna : religious visionary..., Author: Paolo Apolito ; translated by Antony Shugaar., Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Required
ISBN: 0814758258
The Virgin of el barrio : Marian apparitions, Catholic evangelizing, and Mexican American activism, Author: Kristy Nabhan-Warren., Publisher: New York University Press 2005
Required
ISBN: 0385028695
Our Lady of Fatima, Author: by William Thomas Walsh ; introduction by William C. McGrath., Publisher: Doubleday 1990
Required
ISBN: 9053833846
Medjugorje : religion, politics, and violence in rural Bosnia, Author: Mart Bax., Publisher: VU Uitg. 1995
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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