JUDAIC 387 - History of American Jews
Section: 001
Term: FA 2009
Subject: Judaic Studies (JUDAIC)
Department: LSA Judaic Studies
Credits:
4
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course traces the historical development of American Jews from their origins as a small outpost in the colonial era to their evolution as the largest Jewish community in the world. It focuses on the centrality of immigration to that history and the significance of several generations of immigrants and their children in mediating the tensions between the demands of American society for adaptation and the requisites of Jewish religion, culture, and ethnic identity. The course looks at how Jews became American and how they redefined what it meant to be Jewish. It examines their social, economic and political choices. The course employs a variety of sources to explore the history of Jews as an American minority group, a dissenting non-Christian religious group, an immigrant and ethnic group, and a cultural group. These sources include first-person accounts and documents and narrative and analytic histories, as well as media artifacts. It will introduce students to visual and aural dimensions of Jewish culture, employing film, photography, music, and radio. Although structured as a lecture course, it will include regular time set aside for discussion. The course does not assume any prior knowledge of Jewish or American history although such knowledge would be helpful.

Intended audience: Sophomores, juniors, seniors

Course Requirements: Five 1-2 page response papers (30%) (250-500 words) to primary documents to encourage students to engage with surviving records of people's experiences and observations. These writing assignments will provide students with an opportunity for critical thinking and allow them to receive feedback on their writing throughout the academic term. There will also be a Midterm Exam (25%), Final Exam (30%) and Attendance and Preparation (15%).

JUDAIC 387 - History of American Jews
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
40797
Open
16
 
-
MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
002 (DIS)
P
45587
Open
10
 
-
W 5:30PM - 6:30PM
004 (DIS)
P
45591
Open
6
 
-
Th 3:00PM - 4:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 0520248481
The Jews of the United States, Author: Hasia Diner, Publisher: Univesity of California Press PAPERBACK 2004
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0300109768
American Judaism, Author: Jonathan Sarna, Publisher: Yale University Press PAPERBACK 2004
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9780807036327
Fighting to become Americans : Jews, gender, and the anxiety of assimilation, Author: Prell, Riv-Ellen, 1947-, Publisher: Beacon Press 1999
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9780674930704
Urban exodus : why the Jews left Boston and the Catholics stayed, Author: Gamm, Gerald H., Publisher: Harvard University Press 2001
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0231123752
Torn at the Roots, Author: Michael Staub, Publisher: Columbia University Press PAPERBACK 2004
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0966983300
Molly Goldberg cookbook, Author: Gertrude Berg, Publisher: Ivyland Press PAPERBACK 1999
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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