ENGLISH 124 - College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section: 010
Term: WN 2010
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
Course Note:
This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

“The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” — William Faulkner, Requiem for a Nun (1951) What does it mean for a person, a place, or a nation to be haunted? Why do traumatic events often leave traces behind them that can strongly affect people long after the event is over? How and why are ghosts often used to symbolize the malicious or benevolent force which the past plays on the present? And lastly, how and why do we decide what to remember as individuals, communities, and nations? We will explore these issues this academic term by reading texts which address the American experience with slavery, both in the past and in the present. It is, as the title of one of our texts affirms, "The Tough Stuff of American Memory." But it is our job as members of a university community to wrestle with such difficult issues, and to do so in ways which can hopefully lead those outside of our classroom to a better understanding of them. In addition, the process whereby we learn how to delicately and intensively treat such questions is one of the best ways of honing the skills of critical thinking and argumentative writing. The central literary text of the course will be Toni Morrison's Beloved. Therein we are offered a representation of the ways in which the specter of a traumatic past affects the present of a person, a community, and a nation. We will use Morrison's text to think through how other texts from various genres — memoirs, short stories, and histories — represent the American experience with slavery, and how categories such as race, class, and gender affect that experience. Our study of all of these texts and issues will have as their aim the development of the writing skills one needs to succeed at the college level. From thesis construction and the art of close reading to more stylistic concerns, we will cover each of the components which comprise a successful, argumentative, college-level essay. This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts. One of the central means by which you will acquire the skills of analytic writing is peer review and the workshop process. Helping others to improve their writing has proven to be one of the best ways of strengthening one’s own. Through group discussion and one-on-one consultations, you and your classmates will assist one another become better writers and re aders.

ENGLISH 124 - College Writing: Writing and Literature
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
26875
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0
 
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TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
002 (REC)
P
26877
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TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
003 (REC)
P
13171
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0
 
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MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
004 (REC)
P
13173
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1
 
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MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
005 (REC)
P
13177
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0
 
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MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
006 (REC)
P
13179
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0
 
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TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
007 (REC)
P
13183
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0
 
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TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
008 (REC)
P
30321
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0
 
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TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
009 (REC)
P
13185
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1
 
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MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
010 (REC)
P
26881
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0
 
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TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
011 (REC)
P
30323
Open
1
 
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MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
012 (REC)
P
13187
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0
 
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TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
013 (REC)
P
13189
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0
 
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TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
014 (REC)
P
13191
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1
 
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TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
015 (REC)
P
28757
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0
 
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MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
016 (REC)
P
13193
Open
1
 
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MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
017 (REC)
P
28761
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0
 
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TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
018 (REC)
P
28763
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0
 
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MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
019 (REC)
P
13197
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0
 
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MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
020 (REC)
P
26945
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0
 
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MWF 10:00AM - 11:00AM
021 (REC)
P
26947
Closed
0
 
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MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
022 (REC)
P
45923
Open
1
 
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MWF 9:00AM - 10:00AM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


Note:
In addition to purchasing the three required texts, students should also be aware that a good deal of printing (drafts of essays, peer critiques, etc.) will be required, and that this may necessitate some expenditure on their part.
ISBN: 1400033411
Beloved, Author: Morrison, Toni, Publisher: Vintage International 2004
Required
ISBN: 0393065456
"They say/I say" : the moves that matter in persuasive writing, Author: Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein., Publisher: W.W. Norton 2007
Required
ISBN: 9780393979169
Passing : authoritative text, backgrounds and contexts, criticism, Author: Larsen, Nella., Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co 2007
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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