HISTORY 303 - Topics in History
Section: 006 Sport in the Modern World
Term: WN 2010
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Credits:
4
Repeatability:
May be elected twice for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course deals with the history of the ‘modern’ world, and does so by turning to an unusually pervasive and important set of institutions, practices, cultures and writings—those of organized sport. Modern sport embodies many of the characteristics historians have come to understand as central to ‘modernity’. Rather than being reducible to mere games, sport has proven to be a powerful set of developments through which new ways—in personal and bodily conduct, power, education, religious sensibilities, class, race, nation and gender—could be set in motion. The rough, or local, or highly diversified leisures and games predominating before 1700 increasingly gave way to sports held seemingly in common and subject to new kinds of law and discipline. Games became sports, which had not only rules, but uniformly defined time periods and spaces, governing bodies, lawmakers and law enforcers. The horizons of sport were no longer fixed on what people did in their leisure time, but included many kinds of cultural, social, political and personal dimensions, encouraging certain ways of being in the world.

But the histories of the ‘modern world’, as with the histories of sport, are far from simple. Apparent uniformity or evenness was always keyed to other conditions, particularly inequalities in power and resources—most evident in a global arrangement of empires and colonies. Yet sport reveals many of the most difficult and subtle aspects of modernity and ‘globalization’. The spread of sports was always transformative, rested far less on compulsion than willing participation, and was less often replication than appropriation and reinvention. The English sport of cricket came to be a very Indian game. Baseball was taken to China by U.S. missionaries, but faltered. Even the most globally important of all sports, association football, a specifically English form originally, came to be transformed by Latin American cultures, governed by an international federation housed in France, and localized and appropriated by virtually every land on earth. These problems of locality, scale, circulation and connection frame the course’s approach to the modern, to the world, and to sport: all three of which it studies together.

HISTORY 303 - Topics in History
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
45023
Open
20
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
Note: Sections 001-004 Meets with AMCULT 301.
002 (DIS)
P
45024
Closed
0
 
-
Th 1:00PM - 2:00PM
003 (DIS)
P
45025
Open
12
 
-
Th 2:00PM - 3:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
45026
Open
5
 
-
Th 3:00PM - 4:00PM
006 (LEC)
 
46525
Open
1
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
007 (DIS)
P
46526
Closed
0
 
-
M 3:00PM - 4:00PM
008 (DIS)
P
46527
Open
2
 
-
M 4:00PM - 5:00PM
009 (DIS)
P
46528
Closed
0
 
-
W 3:00PM - 4:00PM
010 (LEC)
 
45027
Open
5
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
Note: Sections 010-014 meets with AMCULT 301.
011 (DIS)
P
45028
Open
3
 
-
M 4:00PM - 5:00PM
012 (DIS)
P
45029
Closed
0
 
-
W 12:00PM - 1:00PM
013 (DIS)
P
45030
Open
2
 
-
W 4:00PM - 5:00PM
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