HISTORY 303 - Topics in History
Section: 010 Detroit Politics and Community Organizing
Term: WN 2010
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Credits:
4
Repeatability:
May be elected twice for credit.
Primary Instructor:

  • “How did Detroit get this way?”
  • "Why are the city and suburbs so divided?”
  • “Do sports stadiums and downtown condos make Detroit a ‘cool city’?”
  • “Should the government bailout the auto industry?”
  • “How can community activism revitalize Detroit?”

These are some common questions that are frequently heard in relation to Detroit. Digging below the surface of popular discourse and disagreement, this course seeks to get at the roots of urban social, political and economic issues. This course will present the study of Detroit history and the city’s contemporary struggles as a window into the key crises confronting America in the 21st century: the economic meltdown, the collapse of industry, ecological sustainability, racial segregation, youth violence and incarceration, class inequality, political gridlock, failing schools, and the decline of community.

At the same time, our study will challenge and critique stereotypical depictions of Detroit as hopeless, pathological, and completely abandoned. We will study what historian Thomas Sugrue has called the “origins of the urban crisis” by examining the effects of deindustrialization and racism in the post-World War II era. But we will also probe the history of movement activism in Detroit and investigate the grassroots solutions to the “crisis” being enacted by community organizations.

Please note that this is not a class that will focus primarily on politicians, elections, or public policy. Our broad perspective on politics will address how members of society with competing interests advance distinct visions of Detroit’s past, present, and future. We will especially analyze radical proposals for social change rooted in the belief that the collapse of industrial society necessitates a holistic form of social, cultural, and economic transformation far beyond the piecemeal reforms generally debated in mainstream policy circles.

IMPORTANT: Class assignments may require you to travel to Detroit on a few occasions for self-guided tours or events based on directions the instructor will distribute to students. You will need to secure your own transportation. All questions regarding satisfaction of distribution or concentration requirements should be directed to your proper academic counselor or department.

HISTORY 303 - Topics in History
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
45023
Open
20
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
Note: Sections 001-004 Meets with AMCULT 301.
002 (DIS)
P
45024
Closed
0
 
-
Th 1:00PM - 2:00PM
003 (DIS)
P
45025
Open
12
 
-
Th 2:00PM - 3:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
45026
Open
5
 
-
Th 3:00PM - 4:00PM
006 (LEC)
 
46525
Open
1
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
007 (DIS)
P
46526
Closed
0
 
-
M 3:00PM - 4:00PM
008 (DIS)
P
46527
Open
2
 
-
M 4:00PM - 5:00PM
009 (DIS)
P
46528
Closed
0
 
-
W 3:00PM - 4:00PM
010 (LEC)
 
45027
Open
5
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
Note: Sections 010-014 meets with AMCULT 301.
011 (DIS)
P
45028
Open
3
 
-
M 4:00PM - 5:00PM
012 (DIS)
P
45029
Closed
0
 
-
W 12:00PM - 1:00PM
013 (DIS)
P
45030
Open
2
 
-
W 4:00PM - 5:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 0691121869
The origins of the urban crisis : race and inequality in postwar Detroit, Author: Thomas J. Sugrue., Publisher: Princeton Univ. Press 1. Princet 2005
Required
ISBN: 0805079335
Arc of justice : a saga of race, civil rights, and murder in the Jazz Age, Author: Kevin Boyle., Publisher: Henry Holt 1st Owl Bo 2005
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0853450153
James Boggs, Author: The American Revolution (New 2009 Edition Required), Publisher: Monthly Review Press NEW, 2009 2009
Required
ISBN: 0000000000
Window 2 My Soul (buy online), Author: Yusef Shakur, Publisher: www.yusefshakur.org
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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