RCSSCI 360 - Social Science Junior Seminar
Section: 004 Hands-On History at Historic Fort Wayne
Term: WN 2010
Subject: RC Social Sciences (RCSSCI)
Department: LSA Residential College
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
SS
Other:
Theme
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Upperclass standing.
Repeatability:
May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit(s). May be elected more than once in the same term.
Primary Instructor:

This course will use the example of Historic Fort Wayne to explore the ways in which historic places can be used to enrich the teaching and learning of history, and historic preservation can be used as a tool of community revitalization. Built in the 1840s to defend against possible British attack, the fort has served many functions over the years, including military induction center, prisoner of war camp, social center, and refuge for homeless families during the Great Depression. As such, it is an ideal venue to explore important aspects of Detroit’s history and of Detroit’s role in American and world history. Today, preservationists and community activists hope to restore Historic Fort Wayne for its historic and architectural significance and for its value as a public space crucial to community identity. In cooperation with the Randolph Career and Technical Center in Detroit, students in the course will learn about an innovative curriculum, adopted as a national model by the National Park Service, that teaches preservation skills and techniques. Students will consider how doing hands-on history can add to our understanding of the past and build community. Readings include James Conway and David F. Jamroz, Detroit’s Historic Fort Wayne (Arcadia Images of America, 2007); Dolores Hayden, The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (MIT Press, 1997); Cathy Stanton, The Lowell Experiment: Public History in a Post-Industrial City (UMass Press, 2006) and Matthew B. Crawford, Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work (Penguin, 2009).

RCSSCI 360 - Social Science Junior Seminar
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
37335
Open
7
7RC Ugrd
-
MW 10:00AM - 12:00PM
002 (SEM)
P
42125
Open
10
5RC Ugrd
-
WF 11:00AM - 1:00PM
003 (SEM)
P
19457
Open
5
 
-
Tu 10:00AM - 12:00PM
004 (SEM)
P
42137
Open
15
 
-
Th 10:00AM - 1:00PM
Note: Course will be taught at the Detroit Center, as part of the Semester in Detroit.
005 (SEM)
P
46357
Open
36
 
-
MWF 11:00AM - 12:00PM
006 (SEM)
P
49035
Open
2
 
-
Tu 1:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: This course meets at the Detroit Center and is open ONLY to students in the Semester in Detroit Program.
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 1594202230
Shop class as soulcraft : an inquiry into the value of work, Author: Crawford, Matthew B., Publisher: Penguin Press 2009
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9781558495463
The Lowell experiment : public history in a postindustrial city, Author: Stanton, Cathy., Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press 2006
Required
ISBN: 9780262581523
The power of place urban landscapes as public history, Author: Hayden, Dolores, Publisher: MIT Press 1997
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0738551120
Detroit's historic Fort Wayne, Author: Conway, James E., Publisher: Arcadia Pub 2007
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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