HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Section: 001 Visions of Modern Empire
Term: FA 2010
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Course Note:
Each section of "The Writing of History" will study a different era and topic in the past, for the common purpose of learning how history is written and how to write about it. Students will read the work of modern historians, documents and other source materials from the past. The goal will be to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Waitlist Capacity:
10
Other Course Info:
This course may not be included in a History concentration. F.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course is a cultural history of empire in the 19th and 20th centuries. Rather than focusing on one specific polity, or narratives of political and military domination, we will work within a comparative framework, examining the cultural production of three modern empires: Britain, France, and Russia. Such a study will help us to understand the factors beyond brute force that caused empires to rise, sustain themselves, and collapse.

In the course, we will focus on ethnography, film, and literature from each empire, searching for connections and discontinuities among them. A smattering of key theoretical works will help us to tie together the biggest questions we face (What is an empire? A colony? What is the relationship between the two, and how has this relationship been maintained or challenged?) while providing examples of good historical writing.

This course is intended to develop students’ analytical and argumentative skills for history and other disciplines, as well as to sharpen critical thinking and familiarize students with the basic techniques of historical research. By the end of the course, students will have the opportunity to put these skills to the test, selecting a primary source of their own and producing a short piece of original research based on it.

HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
14233
Closed
0
3Y1
 
-
WF 1:00PM - 2:30PM
Note: ALL SECTIONS OF HISTORY 195 ARE RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.
002 (REC)
P
14235
Closed
0
6Y1
 
-
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
003 (REC)
P
39541
Open
2
7Y1
 
-
WF 10:00AM - 11:30AM
004 (REC)
P
14237
Open
2
5Y1
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
005 (REC)
P
48613
Open
2
11Y1
 
-
WF 11:30AM - 1:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 0812967119
Hadji Murad, Author: Leo Tolstoy ; translation, preface, and notes by Aylmer Maude ; introduction by Azar Nafisi., Publisher: Modern Library Modern Lib 2003
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 0312535031
A pocket guide to writing in history, Author: Mary Lynn Rampolla., Publisher: Bedford/St. Martins 6th ed. 2010
Required
ISBN: 0205632645
The elements of style, Author: by William Strunk Jr. ; with revisions, an introduction, and a chapter on writing by E.B. White., Publisher: Pearson Longman 50th Anniv 2009
Optional
Other Textbook Editions OK.
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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View Historical Syllabi
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