HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Section: 003 African American Politics in Slavery and Freedom
Term: FA 2010
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Course Note:
Each section of "The Writing of History" will study a different era and topic in the past, for the common purpose of learning how history is written and how to write about it. Students will read the work of modern historians, documents and other source materials from the past. The goal will be to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Waitlist Capacity:
10
Other Course Info:
This course may not be included in a History concentration. F.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.

Over the course of the nineteenth century, African American men and women confronted the complicated worlds of enslavement and freedom. In response to these changing experiences, they devised strategies to for self defense, uplift, and resistance to the oppression of enslavement and limits on citizenship in freedom. This course explores this political world of African Americans during the late eighteenth through the late nineteenth century. The purpose of the reading in this course is to expose students to a wide variety of authors and interpretations of African American politics. In class we will expand and interrogate previously held notions of what politics is and where it happens. We will look at the political activity of men and women while enslaved and look at how these political traditions were transformed or persisted following emancipation. We will also learn about the political worlds of free black communities and identify strategies for negotiating the boundaries of citizenship in the United States. During this course we will examine the influence of social class, gender, and ideas of nationalism on African American politics and political culture.

In addition to developing an understanding of African American politics students in this course will gain the indispensable skills needed for college writing. Students will learn to read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts in order to generate and support their writing. Further, they will form complex, analytic and evidence based arguments as they practice writing in a variety or styles. Students will develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths in order to improve their development of ideas. Finally, students will collaborate with classmates and the instructor to create revision strategies, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving these goals. These goals will be achieved through the preparation of formal and informal writing assignments including short discussion papers, an annotated document analysis, a midterm review essay, and a final 8-10 page research paper on an approved topic chosen by the student.

HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
14233
Closed
0
3Y1
 
-
WF 1:00PM - 2:30PM
Note: ALL SECTIONS OF HISTORY 195 ARE RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.
002 (REC)
P
14235
Closed
0
6Y1
 
-
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
003 (REC)
P
39541
Open
2
7Y1
 
-
WF 10:00AM - 11:30AM
004 (REC)
P
14237
Open
2
5Y1
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
005 (REC)
P
48613
Open
2
11Y1
 
-
WF 11:30AM - 1:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


Note:
All other readings will be available via Ctools
ISBN: 0674011694
A nation under our feet : Black political struggles in the rural South from slavery to the great migration, Author: Steven Hahn, Publisher: Belknap Press of Harvard Univ. Press 2003
Required
ISBN: 9780807826386
Black identity & black protest in the antebellum North, Author: Rael, Patrick, Publisher: Univ. of North Carolina Press 2002
Required
ISBN: 0205673708
A short guide to writing about history, Author: Richard Marius, Melvin E. Page., Publisher: Longman 7th ed. 2010
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

Click the button below to view historical syllabi for HISTORY 195 (UM login required)

View Historical Syllabi
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CourseProfile (ART)