HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Section: 004 From Guantanamo to GITMO: Camps, the United States, and Imperial Conflicts in the Twentieth Century and Beyond
Term: FA 2010
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Course Note:
Each section of "The Writing of History" will study a different era and topic in the past, for the common purpose of learning how history is written and how to write about it. Students will read the work of modern historians, documents and other source materials from the past. The goal will be to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Waitlist Capacity:
10
Other Course Info:
This course may not be included in a History concentration. F.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

The camp has become a symbol of the conflicts of the twentieth century. Through a close study of people’s experiences of building, living, and surviving camps throughout the twentieth century, this course examines the major shifts in the global imperial landscape from the Philippine-American Wars at the turn of the twentieth century through the present “War on Terror.” Rather than approaching the “camp” as an exceptional situation to everyday life, we will ask: How have the practices of making a camp changed (or not changed) through decolonization? How do the dynamics and workings of a particular camp shed light on the contemporaneous political landscape? And what type of role does the “camp” play in different societies’ historical memories? Our focus will be on the historical connections between the case-study camps, as we begin with the reconcentrado policy of Spanish colonialism in Cuba in 1880s and end with reflections on the implications of Guantánamo Bay in Cuba for U.S. imperialism. The course will encompass the Herero Uprising against German colonialism in Namibia, the Mau Mau camps constructed by the British in Kenya, and the Japanese American internment camps in the United States.

This course aims to introduce freshmen to the discipline of history and the writing of college-level papers. In addition to reading the work of different historians, we will also look at material ranging from memoirs, oral history interviews, military documents, legal cases, to film. During this course, students will participate in class discussions, write weekly response papers, conduct mini-presentations, and conclude the course with a final research paper.

HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
14233
Closed
0
3Y1
 
-
WF 1:00PM - 2:30PM
Note: ALL SECTIONS OF HISTORY 195 ARE RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.
002 (REC)
P
14235
Closed
0
6Y1
 
-
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
003 (REC)
P
39541
Open
2
7Y1
 
-
WF 10:00AM - 11:30AM
004 (REC)
P
14237
Open
2
5Y1
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
005 (REC)
P
48613
Open
2
 
11Y1
-
WF 11:30AM - 1:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 9780312535032
A pocket guide to writing in history, Author: Mary Lynn Rampolla., Publisher: Bedford/St. Martins 6th ed. 2010
Required
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