HONORS 135 - Ideas in Honors
Section: 005 Politically Incorrect: Evaluating Modern Political Satire
Term: FA 2010
Subject: Honors Program (HONORS)
Department: LSA Honors
Course Note:
A guided journey that opens first-year students' eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. Subject matter and discussions are confronted from the vantage point “Why does it matter?”.
Credits:
1
Other:
Honors, Minicourse
Class Misc Info:
Meets Sept. 15, 22, 29, Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, Nov. 3, 10, 17. Drop/Add Deadline 09-27-10.
Advisory Prerequisites:
First-year standing in the Honors Program.
Grading:
Mandatory credit/no credit.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

The American Heritage Dictionary defines satire as “Irony, sarcasm, or caustic wit used to attack or expose folly, vice, or stupidity.” But most instances of political satire do not merely break down flaws in the status quo; like all forms of communication, they rely on (and reinforce) shared assumptions and prior knowledge. This course asks several questions about modern political satire. What characteristics mark a communication as satirical rather than literal? Whose fault is it when it is misinterpreted? Do satirical messages have any effect on real-life politics? Is satire inherently “conservative” or “liberal?” Is it transferable from culture to culture or context to context? Can we identify what a given satirical communication “means?” If so, can we challenge satirical meanings? Can satire ever be “wrong?”

Reading and viewing material for this class will include literary theory about satire, social science research about its effects and content, and an up-to-date, politically diverse selection of satirical news articles, blogs, websites, political cartoons, and television programs. Examples may include mainstream American sources like Comedy Central’s The Colbert Report, Harvard’s The Onion, and the syndicated political cartoon “Mallard Fillmore,” foreign sources like Britain’s Private Eye, Michigan’s own Gargoyle and The Every Three Weekly, and more obscure sources like YouTube videos and personal blogs. Students will be strongly encouraged to suggest additional examples.

HONORS 135 - Ideas in Honors
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
27537
Open
1
2LSA Hnrs Y1
-
W 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Regenerative Medicine's Moral Achilles Heel Does not meet first week of classes.
002 (SEM)
P
32429
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 5:00PM - 6:30PM
Note: Rwandan Genocide Does not meet first week of classes.
003 (SEM)
P
27539
Open
4
4LSA Hnrs Y1
-
M 2:00PM - 3:00PM
Note: All's Fair in Love and Sport Does not meet first week of classes.
004 (SEM)
P
27541
Closed
0
 
-
M 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Note: Romanticism Does not meet first week of classes.
005 (SEM)
P
29099
Closed
0
2LSA Hnrs Y1
-
W 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Note: Politically Incorrect Does not meet first week of classes.
006 (SEM)
P
29113
Open
2
2LSA Hnrs Y1
-
Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
Note: From Throw-Away Fun to Morality Play Does not meet first week of classes.
007 (SEM)
P
30871
Open
1
2LSA Hnrs Y1
-
W 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Thalidomide and Other Case Studies Does not meet first week of classes.
008 (SEM)
P
32431
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: The Financial Crisis for Dummies Does not meet first week of classes.
009 (SEM)
P
43797
Open
1
2LSA Hnrs Y1
-
M 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: The Physics of the Fascinating Does not meet first week of classes.
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