POLSCI 319 - The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
Section: 001
Term: FA 2010
Subject: Political Science (POLSCI)
Department: LSA Political Science
Credits:
4
Advisory Prerequisites:
POLSCI 111.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Legal decisions involving civil rights are lenses through which we can view the history of America’s struggle over race. This course begins with the crisis over slavery 150 years ago and works its way forward, examining the links between civil rights decisions and wider social and political practices. We will cover the watershed Reconstruction Amendments that were added to the U.S. Constitution after the Civil War, examining competing post-war interpretations of what “equality under law” required and what it meant to “destroy” slavery. We move on to study Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), the infamous decision that upheld a Jim Crow segregation statute, and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the landmark 20th-century decision that struck down legal segregation in education. We will examine the various dilemmas that confronted the Court in Brown, as well as the problem of providing federal legal remedies for unpunished lynching and racial violence. The course also includes units on the legal construction of “whiteness” in the law of naturalized citizenship and Korematsu v. United States (1944), the Supreme Court decision that ratified the U.S. policy of interning Japanese-Americans during World War II. Recent court cases involving the Guantanamo detainees and U.S. policies in the “war on terror” will be discussed in the context of Korematsu. The course concludes with an in-depth examination of Grutter v. Bollinger (2003) and Gratz v. Bollinger (2003), the Court decisions involving affirmative action at the University of Michigan. A number of themes run throughout the course, including constitutional politics, theories of race, conceptions of legal equality, American identity, and the nature of race prejudice.

POLSCI 319 - The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
38107
Open
10
 
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
002 (DIS)
P
38109
Open
2
 
-
F 9:00AM - 10:00AM
003 (DIS)
P
38113
Closed
0
 
-
M 5:00PM - 6:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
38115
Closed
0
 
-
M 6:00PM - 7:00PM
005 (DIS)
P
38117
Open
2
 
-
M 4:00PM - 5:00PM
006 (DIS)
P
38119
Open
1
 
-
Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
007 (DIS)
P
38121
Open
5
 
-
F 10:00AM - 11:00AM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 0060964316
A short history of Reconstruction, 1863-1877, Author: Eric Foner., Publisher: Harper & Row 1st ed. 1990
Required
ISBN: 0809078961
Prisoners without trial : Japanese Americans in World War II, Author: Roger Daniels, Publisher: Hill and Wang Rev. ed. 2004
Required
ISBN: 0743286863
Guantanamo and the abuse of presidential power, Author: Joseph Margulies., Publisher: Simon & Schuster 1st Simon 2007
Required
ISBN: 0700613161
Murder in Mississippi United States v. Price and the struggle for civil rights, Author: Howard Ball., Publisher: University Press of Kansas 2004
Required
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