AAS 358 - Topics in Black World Studies
Section: 008 Environmental History in Detroit
Term: WN 2014
Subject: Afroamerican & African Studies (AAS)
Department: LSA Afroamerican and African Studies
Credits:
3
Waitlist Capacity:
99
Repeatability:
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit(s).
Primary Instructor:

Environmental history is the study of how people have both affected and been affected by their physical surroundings over time. In this course, we will learn to look at the world around us with a historical eye, thinking about how local landscapes got the way they are today and how our perceptions of those landscapes are shaped by cultural and social ideas about the environment. We will think about the impacts of global and national processes and events, as well as local changes, on specific sites, and learn how to contextualize environmental changes within broad historical trends.

The class gives you a chance to “do” environmental history, walking through landscapes, asking questions, and analyzing sources while applying the theories and ideas we will learn in class. In early February, the class will take a Saturday field trip to Detroit to meet our community partners and tour some of the neighborhoods, parks, and gardens that make up the city’s diverse landscape. For the rest of the academic term, you will work in groups to design and conduct in-depth research on that landscape, culminating in the creation of a multimedia website (using images, maps, text, video/audio, etc.) which will be made available to the Detroit community. You will visit multiple archives and libraries, learn to navigate and analyze a wide range of visual sources, and conduct interviews with long-time residents in the city. Through this project you will come to understand how historical changes in the material world, and the ways people think about that world, have had concrete impacts on peoples’ lives. In addition, the websites you create will help local residents better understand the ways in which their city has changed over time and how their personal experiences are connected to larger stories.

Course Requirements:

This course has no exams. Instead, your grade will be based on the quality and consistency of your participation in the group project, your engagement with assigned readings and discussions, and the depth of the critical analysis reflected in your final assignments.

Intended Audience:

No data submitted

Class Format:

No data submitted

AAS 358 - Topics in Black World Studies
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
24612
Open
Wolv. Access
 
-
MW 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Note: CAAS 358.001 meets with DANCE 348.001.
003 (SEM)
P
30329
Open
Wolv. Access
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
005 (SEM)
P
29155
Open
29
 
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
006 (SEM)
P
29158
Open
14
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
007 (SEM)
P
30274
Open
Wolv. Access
 
-
F 2:00PM - 5:00PM
Note: This class meets at the U-M Detroit Center, 3663 Woodward Ave, Detroit, MI 48201
008 (SEM)
P
31338
Closed
Wolv. Access
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 9780809015832
The Organic machine the remaking of the Columbia river, Author: White, Richard (1947-....)., Publisher: Hill and Wang 1996
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
ISBN: 9780822939825
Out of the woods : essays in environmental history, Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press 1997
Required
Other Textbook Editions OK.
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

Click the button below to view historical syllabi for AAS 358 (UM login required)

View Historical Syllabi