COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Section: 002 Reading the Hipster: Taste, Nostalgia, and Authenticity
Term: WN 2014
Subject: Comparative Literature (COMPLIT)
Department: LSA Comparative Literature
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Other:
WorldLit
Waitlist Capacity:
50
Consent:
With permission of department.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Do you enjoy understated irony, indie music, and artisan coffee? You might be a hipster. This first-year writing course will explore how the term hipster has been defined from the 1940’s to the present day and what youth subculture can teach us about identity formation. Our first unit on “taste” will treat recent trends in food culture and ethical consumption in order to ask what descriptors like vegan, free-range, and fair trade reveal about social distinction and class. The second unit on “nostalgia” considers how hipsters cultivate a relationship to the past, whether this means buying vintage or learning to knit and pickle, all hallmarks of the New Domesticity. Finally, our third unit on “authenticity” will examine the degree to which irony informs the performance of hipster identity from geek chic to hip hop and beyond.

The primary objective of this course is to help students develop complex, analytic, and well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Working closely with their peers and instructor, each student will produce 25-30 pages of polished prose by the end of the semester. Readings will span a variety of genres and disciplines with selections from Pierre Bourdieu, Slavoj Zizek, Baldassare Castiglione, Norman Mailer, and Jack Kerouac among others.

COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
17933
Open
2
 
-
MWF 9:00AM - 10:00AM
002 (REC)
P
17934
Closed
0
 
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MWF 11:00AM - 12:00PM
003 (REC)
P
20329
Closed
0
 
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MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
004 (REC)
P
21944
Closed
0
 
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TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
005 (REC)
P
23183
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
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