COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Section: 005 Invisibility As the New Visible
Term: WN 2014
Subject: Comparative Literature (COMPLIT)
Department: LSA Comparative Literature
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Other:
WorldLit
Waitlist Capacity:
50
Consent:
With permission of department.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

What is invisibility? Invisibility is understood broadly and is intended to cover categories such as culture, gender, sexual orientation, social class, politics, beliefs, religion music and race. In order to analyze how invisibility is socially fabricated through cultural productions in different moments in our history, we will be focusing on literary and non-literary works (e.g., Invisible Man), films (e.g., The Invisible Woman; Say My Name) and comics (e.g., Aya of Yop City; Persepolis). In others words we try to understand how the aesthetic of invisibility is addressed in different genres:

  • What are the different possible meanings of invisibility?
  • What does it mean to say that someone is invisible?
  • Does our appearance or voicing always reflect the fact that we might be noticed, therefore visible to the others? Therefore, to whom are we invisible?
  • Where is located the dual aesthetic of visibility/invisibility: in how we understand or translate the meaning? Or is it located from the point of view of the place we occupy in the space?

The primary materials for this course is originate from a variety of cultures and languages, all materials will be available in English. We will therefore consider how translated source materials reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as linguistic choices, and we will as well try to capture how they could participate in informing the process of “invisibilzation.” In others words, we will compare and analyze how invisibility is made tangible in some cultural productions. The course aims at providing students with the necessary tools to write in an argumentative, creative, and analytical manner. Students will also work to further develop the ability to read texts and other media in a more critical and informed way. This course will provide an opportunity to practice the communication skills needed in both academic and non-academic settings.

Course Requirements:

Students will produce 25-30 pages of revised, polished prose divided in four (4) essays, in addition to other assignments.

Intended Audience:

No data submitted

Class Format:

No data submitted

COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
17933
Open
2
 
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MWF 9:00AM - 10:00AM
002 (REC)
P
17934
Closed
0
 
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MWF 11:00AM - 12:00PM
003 (REC)
P
20329
Closed
0
 
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MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
004 (REC)
P
21944
Closed
0
 
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TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
005 (REC)
P
23183
Closed
0
 
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TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
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