ENGLISH 520 - Introduction to Graduate Studies
Section: 001
Term: FA 2017
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
Credits:
3
Consent:
With permission of department.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Graduate standing in English or Women's Studies and permission of instructor.
Other Course Info:
A required course for first-year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies Graduate students only.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course serves as an introduction to graduate studies and to the discipline of literary studies as it has evolved over the past century. Readings will include Gerald Graff’s Professing Literature and other short histories of the discipline and profession. We will also read through some of the more contemporary developments in the field as curated in the “Theories and Methodologies” section of the PMLA over the last decade. A good portion of our time will be spent on practical matters such as making productive use of the resources available in the library and other units across campus. Students will be expected to complete library based assignments, actively participate in class and present a final paper on a topic to be determined in consultation with the instructor.

Intended Audience:

This course is restricted to and required of 1st Year Lang & Lit and E&WS Ph.D.’s Only

ENGLISH 520 - Introduction to Graduate Studies
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
11357
Closed
0
 
-
M 5:00PM - 8:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 9780804795265
Why Literary Periods Mattered, Author: Ted Underwood, Publisher: Stanford University Press 2015 2015
Required
ISBN: 9780231168014
The elements of academic style : writing for the humanities, Author: Eric Hayot. 2014
Required
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