ENGLISH 831 - Seminar: The Study of Genre
Section: 001 Novel Readings
Term: FA 2017
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
Credits:
3
Consent:
With permission of department.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course explores recent methodological debates in literary studies, mainly as these have been conducted on the terrain of the nineteenth-century British novel. More specifically, we will investigate various methods that have sprung up in the wake of the supposed exhaustion of critique, symptomatic reading, and the hermeneutics of suspicion, such as reparative reading, surface reading, just reading, literal reading, distant reading, description, and cognitive approaches. We will consider as well defenses of the continued purchase of various forms of critique.

To focus our efforts, we will pay particular attention to the critical and theoretical fortunes of one of the novel-genre’s fundamental components: character. Left for dead by poststructuralism, fictional character has re-emerged over the past two decades as one of the liveliest topics in novel studies. As we will see, compelling work is being done on its historicity, ontology, and phenomenology.

Novelists we will read include Austen (probably Emma), Dickens (Great Expectations), Eliot (probably Middlemarch), and Hardy (Tess of the d’Urbervilles). Critics and theorists will likely include Rita Felski, Catherine Gallagher, Fredric Jameson, John Kucich, Bruno Latour, Deidre Lynch, Sharon Marcus, D. A. Miller, Bruce Robbins, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Blakey Vermeule, Michael Warner, and Alex Woloch. Feel free to contact me for updates on the syllabus, or with suggestions.

Since this is an 800-level course, students will be expected to produce a substantial (15-20 page) research paper. Papers must engage with topics and issues addressed in the course, but can focus on primary texts from any historical period.

Course Requirements:

Since this is an 800-level course, students will be expected to produce a substantial (15-20 page) research paper. Papers must engage with topics and issues addressed in the course, but can focus on primary texts from any historical period.

ENGLISH 831 - Seminar: The Study of Genre
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
31138
Open
2
 
-
 
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


Note:
These are recommended editions of the novels we'll be studying, but any modern, edited edition (with a note on the text and explanatory notes) is fine.
ISBN: 9780199535521
Emma, Author: Jane Austen., Publisher: Oxford University Press New ed. 2008
Required
ISBN: 9780199219766
Great expectations, Author: Charles Dickens ; edited by Margaret Cardwell ; with an introduction and notes by Robert Douglas-Fairhurst., Publisher: Oxford University Press New ed. 2008
Required
ISBN: 0141439548
Middlemarch, Author: George Eliot. Edited with an introduction and notes by Rosemary Ashton., Publisher: Penguin Books Repr. 2003
Required
ISBN: 0312106882
Tess of the d'Urbervilles : Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism, Author: Thomas Hardy ; edited by John Paul Riquelme., Publisher: Bedford Books 1998
Required
ISBN: 0393264866
Heart of Darkness: Norton Critical Edition, Author: Joseph Conrad, Publisher: Norton FIFTH
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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