HISTART 194 - First Year Seminar
Section: 003 Why Art? In the Galleries and Behind the Scenes at the Museum
Term: FA 2017
Subject: History of Art (HISTART)
Department: LSA History of Art
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Other:
FYSem
Waitlist Capacity:
99
Cost:
50-100
Advisory Prerequisites:
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing.
Other Course Info:
May not be used to meet the prerequisite requirement for the History of Art major.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Why do we value works of visual art? Why do we display such objects in our homes and in museums? How do works of art "work" when we look at them? What do we get out of reading art criticism and art history? This course provides an introduction to the study of visual art at the college-level and an inside-view of the University of Michigan Museum of Art, one of the top university museums in the country. Each week we will devote one meeting to classroom activities and one meeting to first-hand study of objects in the galleries or "behind the scenes" in the object study room of the UMMA. We will meet curators of the various collections in the museum, to ask questions about the objects that fascinate them as well as to learn about their professions. We will look at some of the outstanding masterpieces on view in the UMMA, from a late-medieval altarpiece to Guercino’s Esther before Ahasuerus of 1639, to a work of 1960s Abstract Expressionism by Franz Klein, to Tyree Guyton’s Untitled (Paint Cans) finished in 2010. We will also look at some broken and unfinished objects that are never seen by the general public but are highly rewarding for what they can tell us about the techniques and materials artists have used. Students will gain experience in several ways of looking at visual art and practice in speaking and writing about why such things are made and why they look the way they do.

Assigned readings will be drawn from Anne D’Alleva’s Look! The Fundamentals of Art History (3rd edition) and from a variety of articles and book chapters that will be posted on the course website. Writing assignments will require a copy of Michael Harvey’s The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing (2nd edition).

Textbooks:

Anne D’Alleva, Look! The Fundamentals of Art History, 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010. ISBN 978-0-20-576871-4

Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing, 2nd ed., Indianapolis: Hackett, 2013. ISBN: 9781603848985

Course Requirements:

Dedicated attendance and participation in discussion; two short papers and a longer research paper; two short slide-essay exams.

Intended Audience:

First-year undergraduates

Class Format:

Seminar, meets 1 ½ hours twice per week

HISTART 194 - First Year Seminar
Schedule Listing
002 (SEM)
P
30988
Closed
0
1Y1
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
003 (SEM)
P
30989
Open
2
2Y1
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


Coursepack Location:
To be announced
ISBN: 9780205768714
Look! : the fundamentals of art history, Author: Anne D'Alleva., Publisher: Pearson Prentice Hall 3rd ed. 2010
Required
ISBN: 9781603848985
The nuts & bolts of college writing, Author: Michael Harvey., Publisher: Hackett Pub. Co. 2nd ed. 2013
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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