HISTORY 101 - What is History?
Section: 001
Term: FA 2017
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
HU, RE
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:
Instructor:

HISTORY 101 will provide an overview of the various approaches scholars take when studying the past. The goal is to show you why our work matters and how it differs from what you learned in secondary school or from TV documentaries. The emphasis will be on the debates that animate our discipline, and you can expect to come away from the class with a recognition that “the past” is not just lying there waiting to be uncovered, but rather something to be interpreted and analyzed in ways that give meaning to our lives today.

Just what is “History”? Put simply, history is the study of the past: everything that humans have ever done, in every imaginable area of life. In a history class you can learn about politics, art, war, peace, family life, diplomacy, economics, childrearing, technology, science, farming, music, and much more. There really is no limit: if it happened, historians study it. But the discipline is more than just a grab-bag of trivia. Historical research reminds us that the way we live our lives today is not set in stone, and that our world is one we constantly create and re-create for ourselves. Perhaps even more important, we are reminded that the way we tell our historical stories — what we remember, what we forget, what we emphasize, what we gloss over — is always in flux and always open for debate. Ultimately, a belief in human agency — our power to make and transform our world — is at the heart of our discipline.

Related to this is the conviction that complexity matters, that life is too complicated to be reduced to grand abstractions or generalizations that treat people as objects rather than subjects. The past, present, and future are irreducibly complex and never predestined. This course will provide an overview of the various approaches scholars take when studying the past. The goal is to show you why our work matters and how it differs from what you learned in secondary school or from TV documentaries. The emphasis will be on the debates that animate our discipline, and you can expect to come away with a recognition that “the past” is not just lying there waiting to be uncovered, but rather something to be interpreted and analyzed in ways that give meaning to our lives.

Course Requirements:

Assignments for this course consist of one short essay (2-3 pages), two take-home short-essay exams, and two short reading quizzes, along with weekly participation in discussion sections and in lectures (using i>Clicker).

Intended Audience:

This course is designed with first- and second-year students in mind, but the course is open to anyone interested in gaining an introductory overview of the discipline of history.

Class Format:

Two lectures and one GSI-led discussion section per week.

HISTORY 101 - What is History?
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
26957
Open
6
 
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
002 (DIS)
P
26958
Open
1
 
-
F 10:00AM - 11:00AM
003 (DIS)
P
26959
Closed
0
 
-
F 11:00AM - 12:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
26960
Closed
0
 
-
F 12:00PM - 1:00PM
005 (DIS)
P
26961
Closed
0
 
-
Th 1:00PM - 2:00PM
006 (DIS)
P
26962
Closed
0
 
-
Th 1:00PM - 2:00PM
007 (DIS)
P
26963
Open
2
 
-
Th 2:00PM - 3:00PM
008 (DIS)
P
27370
Open
2
 
-
Th 3:00PM - 4:00PM
009 (DIS)
P
29717
Open
1
 
-
Th 3:00PM - 4:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 9780674766907
The return of Martin Guerre, Author: Davis, Natalie Zemon, 1928-, Publisher: Harvard University Press 1983
Required
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