PUBPOL 750 - Special Topics
Section: 312 Housing America's Working Poor
Term: FA 2017
Subject: Public Policy (PUBPOL)
Department: SPP: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
Credits:
3 (Non-LSA credit).
Waitlist Capacity:
99
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Permission of Instructor.
Repeatability:
May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit(s).
Primary Instructor:
Instructor:

Course description will vary depending on instructor. Subtitles will change from term to term. Different topics might be offered by different faculty in the same term.

PUBPOL 750 - Special Topics
Schedule Listing
101 (LEC)
P
32232
Open
9
7PUBLIC POL GRAD
14Graduate Standing
-
F 9:00AM - 12:00PM
Note: Taught by Dudley Benoit Towsley Policymaker in Residence, Director of Community Development Investments at Santander Mr. Benoit joined NJCC?s Board in 2001 and currently serves as Board Chair and Credit Committee Chair. A nationally recognized expert on community development financial institutions (CDFIs), Mr. Benoit currently serves as Director of Community Development Investments at Santander. Mr. Benoit previously held the position of Senior Vice President and Regional Sales Manager on Chase?s Commercial Term Lending team, where he leads the multifamily lending business in the Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. markets. Prior to assuming his current position, Mr. Benoit spent five years managing the Intermediaries Lending group in Chase?s Community Development Banking unit, where he worked closely with many community development financiers. Mr. Benoit also previously managed JPMorgan Chase?s New Markets Tax Credit program. Mr. Benoit holds an MBA from Columbia Business School, a Master of Public Policy from the University of Michigan?s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, and a BA from Rutgers University-New Brunswick.
103 (LEC)
P
28825
Closed
0
3PUBLIC POL GRAD
13Graduate Standing
-
M 6:00PM - 8:00PM
Note: Taught by editorial page editor of The Detroit News Nolan Finley A look at the unique deal that settled Detroit's municipal bankruptcy. Foundations, corporations, foundations and governments stepped out of their normal operating boundaries to craft an $800 million agreement that allowed Detroit to move out of Chapter 9 without a fire sale of its assets or sacrificing its pensioners. The class will examine the part played by each of the principles, and how the experience in Detroit changed the way collaborations between government, foundations and the business community will work in the future. Class will feature guest appearances by and video-taped interviews with many of those involved in the Grand Bargain. It is taught by Nolan Finley, editorial page editor of The Detroit News, who covered bankruptcy. Class will be held from October 23 - December 11
198 (LEC)
P
36728
Open
1
 
-
 
200 (LEC)
P
25871
Closed
0
 
-
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
MWF 8:30AM - 10:00AM
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
F 2:30PM - 4:00PM
F 2:30PM - 4:00PM
305 (LEC)
P
25869
Closed
0
9PUBLIC POL GRAD
7Graduate Standing
-
MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
Note: Climate change often feels like a problem that our brains have been hardwired to ignore. Climate change is abstract and complex, making it hard for non-scientists (including policy-makers) to understand. For most Americans, it is a problem that will harm people who are far away in time and geography. And the significant political polarization surrounding climate change has turned it into a form of identity politics. Yet like so many environmental problems?from habitat destruction to overconsumption of natural resources?climate change is the result of human behavior. If we want to solve or mitigate these problems, we must first understand what is driving these beliefs and behaviors. Most policy to address environmental issues such as climate change has focused on legal or economic tools such as prohibiting certain forms of pollution or giving subsidies for renewable energy. In this discussion-based policy seminar, we will examine an alternative framework for motivating environmentally-friendly behavior: psychological and social incentives. We will explore factors affecting climate change beliefs and related behaviors, including reactions to and support for policies. The focus will be primarily on the US, and we will discuss policy programs and private interventions that have incorporated social psychological research to promote climate change mitigation as well as potential new applications of this research. Although this class will mainly cover climate change and other environmental issues, the psychological tools we will discuss are used in other domains as well, so will be useful to students interested in a range of policy topics.
307 (LEC)
P
32046
Open
6
4PUBLIC POL GRAD
15Graduate Standing
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
Note: Oliver Wendell Holmes famously said that "Taxes are what we pay for civilized society," but who should pay and how much? In this course, we will develop the tools of policy analysis and economics to engage in several current debates in tax policy at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Examples include: - Carbon taxes, soda/sugar taxes and other sin taxes--What are the pros and cons? - "Economic development wars"--Should states and local governments use big tax breaks to lure businesses? - "Amazon tax"--Should Amazon and other online retailers have to collect state and local sales taxes? States are losing hundreds of millions of dollars and brick and mortar stores argue that online retailers have an unfair advantage. - The "Buffet Rule"--How much do the rich pay in taxes and how much should they pay? - The "Double Irish Dutch Sandwich" and other strategies to use international tax havens--What is being done? What should be done? Students will prepare short writing assignments and engage in mock debates on policy issues. The major project in the class will be the development of a white paper on a topic of choice.
310 (LEC)
P
32234
Closed
0
 
-
W 3:15PM - 4:15PM
W 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: Connected and Autonomous Vehicle Technology: Business and Regulatory Issues This course is one of four interdisciplinary problem solving courses offered at the Law School in fall 2017. Graduate and professional students in business, economics, engineering, information, law, and public policy are eligible to take this course. This problem solving course will challenge an interdisciplinary team of students to address a real-world problem in the rapidly evolving connected and autonomous vehicle landscape. The Detroit Metro area and the University of Michigan are leading the world in researching and deploying technological advances in vehicle connectivity and automation. The potential benefits of "driverless cars" are widely understood, but the path to getting from the current state of human driving to a world of interconnected and self-driven vehicles entails an overwhelming confluence of technological, legal, regulatory, political, and business issues. This course will focus on one particular problem -- the coordination of intellectual property rights, business assets, and technological standardization by industry and governmental stakeholders. Classes will be run as discovery sessions with industry, governmental, and academic experts. Students working in interdisciplinary sub-teams will dive deeply into particular aspects of the problem, and the course culminates in the creation of an integrated class deliverable in the form of a business or operational plan proposing concrete solutions.
311 (LEC)
P
32235
Open
4
 
-
Tu 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Tu 4:10PM - 6:10PM
Note: Economic Integration for Individuals in the Refugee Resettlement Program This course is one of four interdisciplinary problem solving courses offered at the Law School in fall 2017. Graduate and professional students in business, economics, law, public policy, and social work are eligible to take this course. Both refugees and foreign national victims of human trafficking are eligible for refugee resettlement benefits. How can these benefits be optimized to increase individual economic empowerment and economic development for the communities in which these individuals are resettled? This course will develop innovations to facilitate the economic integration of refugees and victims of human trafficking both during and after the resettlement process. These innovations may include educational programs to help these individuals start businesses or find employment, matching services to help them find entrepreneurship or career development mentors, funding or microfinance options to help them fund new businesses, or legal assistance to secure the documents necessary to obtain employment or start a business.
312 (LEC)
P
32236
Open
5
 
-
Tu 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Tu 4:10PM - 6:10PM
Note: Stable and Integrated Housing for America's Working Poor This course is one of four interdisciplinary problem solving courses offered at the Law School in fall 2017. Graduate and professional students in architecture and urban planning, business, law, sociology, public health, public policy, and social work are eligible to take this course. Working as a group with guidance from the instructors, students will design an interdisciplinary, comprehensive plan to address the unavailability of affordable, stable, and integrated housing for working poor people in the United States. We will focus on innovative, community-based solutions to this problem. Students will work collaboratively across disciplines to create a coherent plan to present to a hypothetical client such as a local, state, or federal governmental agency or a foundation. Class sessions will focus heavily on presentations or interviews with experts. Students also will be expected to spend significant time outside of class working in teams to reach out to relevant stakeholders, conduct research, draft documents, and otherwise work toward the creation of the plan. Although students will be broken into teams and assigned different projects, the class as a whole will work as a team to create a single interdisciplinary plan. Through active participation in the course, students will learn how to solve a social problem through analysis of best practices across a variety of disciplines, work effectively with members of a team, and generate policy.
313 (LEC)
P
32237
Open
6
 
-
W 3:15PM - 4:15PM
W 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: Identifying Victims of Human Trafficking within Health Care Settings This course is one of four interdisciplinary problem solving courses offered at the Law School in fall 2017. Graduate and professional students in dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, public health, public policy, and social work are eligible to take this course. It is estimated that up to one third of all victims of human trafficking come into contact with a health care provider during their trafficking and are unrecognized. Health care settings offer a unique opportunity to identify victims of human trafficking and connect them with services and support. In a collaborative, multidisciplinary setting, students will develop innovations to increase the identification of victims of human trafficking in health care settings.
502 (LEC)
P
24362
Open
7
5PUBLIC POL GRAD
10Graduate Standing
1
Tu 4:00PM - 7:00PM
Note: This is a short introductory course module in facilitating complex and difficult dialogic moments of engagement in the social, professional and institutional spheres of the public arena. Its purpose is to provide the possibility for actual engagement with tense social issues and phenomena bedeviling complex societies. It will briefly explore the historical and theoretical contexts, which give rise to sometimes painful and traumatic moments that filter in and color what may otherwise be perceived as simplistic conversations and interactions. It will introduce students?regardless of perceived color, gender, class, or ethnic identity categorization?to the necessity for transcending their subject locations. In order to facilitate, mediate, and engage in trans-formative moments of learning, dialogue, leadership and communal capacity building with due regard of difference and the respect of mutuality.
509 (LEC)
P
32267
Open
18
20PUBLIC POL GRAD
23Graduate Standing
-
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
Note: The Persian Gulf is characterized by countries whose economies are built around a valuable natural resource, oil. In political science and international relations theory, countries like this are known as "rentier states": states which derive all or a substantial portion of national revenues from the rent of indigenous resources to external clients. The course uses cases from the Gulf, and particularly Oman, to illustrate both general features of rentier states and the importance of understanding the special dynamics of individual states and regions. The first half of the course will use The Rentier State by Hazem Beblawi (2016) to examine the interrelationships of the economic base with cultural, social and political structures created to manage natural resources. In the second half of the course, cases from Oman will be used to apply the concepts covered in in the first half of the course to labor and employment policy, social policy, foreign direct investment (FDI) , and government structure and spending. Students? assessments are based on one in-class exam and two case analysis reports.
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