ANTHRBIO 201 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Section: 001
Term: WN 2018
Subject: Anthropology, Biological (ANTHRBIO)
Department: LSA Anthropology
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
BS, NS
BS:
This course counts toward the 60 credits of math/science required for a Bachelor of Science degree.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

What is the material basis of evolution? How have humans evolved? Why do humans behave in the manner that they do? This class seeks answers to these enduring questions. The course will be divided into three parts, emphasizing the processes that have shaped human evolution and how these have produced who we are.

  1. We will begin by reviewing the theory of evolution:
    • What evidence exists to demonstrate that evolution has actually occurred?
    • What factors cause evolution?
    • How are complex biological adaptations produced?
    • How can we explain the origin of new species?

      This section will conclude with an introduction to the biology and behavior of our closest living relatives, the nonhuman primates. These animals will be used to address two major problems in evolutionary biology:

    • How can we explain the existence of altruism, i.e., behavior that benefits others while inflicting a cost to actors.
    • What accounts for the evolution of elaborate and seemingly bizarre structures, such as the feathers of a male peacock, that have no clear bearing on survival?
  2. The second part of the class will be devoted to investigating human evolution.
    • What is the fossil evidence for human evolution?
    • What anatomical changes occurred during the course of our evolution?
    • How did our behavior change and when did these changes take place?
    • How have genetic data been used to answer questions about our evolution?
  3. The course will conclude by asking how evolution has affected aspects of contemporary human biology and behavior.
    • Are human races a valid biological construct?
    • Why do we grow old and die?
    • Why do we get sick?
    • How do we choose our mates?

Course Requirements:

Three tests plus discussion section grade assigned by GSI.

Intended Audience:

This class is appropriate for students of all levels who are interested in exploring what it means to be human from an evolutionary perspective. Students interested in obtaining an evolutionary anthropology or anthropology degree, and those with interests in biology and other health-related fields are also target audiences.

Class Format:

Three lectures plus one discussion/lab meeting per week.

ANTHRBIO 201 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 
10910
Open
195
 
-
MWF 10:00AM - 11:00AM
002 (DIS)
P
10911
Open
25
 
-
M 1:00PM - 2:00PM
003 (DIS)
P
10912
Open
25
 
-
M 2:00PM - 3:00PM
004 (DIS)
P
10913
Open
25
 
-
M 3:00PM - 4:00PM
005 (DIS)
P
10914
Open
25
 
-
Tu 12:00PM - 1:00PM
006 (DIS)
P
10915
Open
25
 
-
Tu 10:00AM - 11:00AM
007 (DIS)
P
10916
Open
25
 
-
Tu 11:00AM - 12:00PM
008 (DIS)
P
10917
Open
25
 
-
W 12:00PM - 1:00PM
009 (DIS)
P
10918
Open
20
20LSA Hnrs
-
W 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Note: Honors Section
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 9780393603453
How Humans Evolved, Author: Robert Boyd and Joan Silk, Publisher: WW Norton 8 2017
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

Click the button below to view historical syllabi for ANTHRBIO 201 (UM login required)

View Historical Syllabi
The CourseProfile (ART) system, supported by the U-M Provost’s 3rd Century Initiative through a grant to the Digital Innovation Greenhouse, provides additional information about: course enrollments; academic terms and instructors; student academic profiles (school/college, majors), and previous, concurrent, and subsequent course enrollments.

CourseProfile (ART)