ENGLISH 298 - Introduction to Literary Studies
Section: 004 Hide and Seek?
Term: WN 2018
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Other Course Info:
Prerequisite for the English major and English Honors Plan.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

The purpose of the gateway course into the concentration, as I see it, is to make you conscious of a variety of genres and critical approaches, and to prepare you for upper-level English and other Humanities courses, in terms of both your oral and written interpretive skills. To that end, we will look at many genres: poetry, oration, (silent and sound) film, the essay, the short story and the novel. Paired with these primary sources will be essays reflecting forms of theory and interpretation prominent over the last hundred years arising from psychoanalysis, Marxism, media studies, gender studies, post-colonialism, disability studies, and environmentalism. The texts and films are drawn from the Atlantic world since the era of Romanticism, with a particular emphasis on the 20th- and 21st-century reckoning with such issues as modernity, class, colonialism, urban life, diaspora and post-slavery. While all of these works address processes of vanishing and finding, one of the issues that specifically emerges is how families and cultures hide, willfully or not, aspects of their own history, and the role of art and criticism in drawing out into the open that which has become hidden. We will debate whether that drawing out is indeed the function of what we might do in the English classroom. I will foreground the various phases through which we move as we come to know our object of study closely, stages one might call: noticing, collecting, hazarding, staking, and reflecting. We will practice together doing these things and discuss how best to gain insight about a cultural and literary text in ways that matter to you, fulfill your curiosity, hone your talents, and make you a thoroughly attentive person. A number short reading responses and two shortish papers (4-5 pages).

Some of the authors/filmmakers and titles we’ll encounter are: Keats, ”Ode on a Grecian Urn”; Poe, “Purloined Letter”; Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Marx, selections; Frost, “Spring Pools”; Freud, “The Uncanny,” Benjamin, “The Work of Art ...“; Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury; Chaplin, City Lights: Coppola, The Conversation; Haneke, Cache; Said, from Orientalism; and Krauss, Forest Dark.

ENGLISH 298 - Introduction to Literary Studies
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
23336
Open
25
 
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TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
002 (REC)
P
27158
Open
25
 
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MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
003 (REC)
P
11411
Open
25
 
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TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
004 (REC)
P
11412
Open
25
 
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TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
005 (REC)
P
18778
Open
25
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
006 (REC)
P
11410
Open
25
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
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