ENGLISH 298 - Introduction to Literary Studies
Section: 005 What is Literature For?
Term: WN 2018
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Other Course Info:
Prerequisite for the English major and English Honors Plan.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course is an introduction to college-level literary analysis and a prerequisite for the English major and minor. It is designed to teach you basic and advanced skills for success in upper-level English courses and in other college courses in which critical reading and strong writing skills are necessary to engage fully and successfully with the course material. The course emphasizes that there is not a single approach to reading literature: the study of literature is a discipline concerned as much with how we read as what we read, and in recent decades it has developed many different approaches to interpreting expressive and narrative texts. This class will introduce you to some of these, while honing the basic interpretive skills on which they depend.

In order to think about how we read literature, however, we need to start with the question of what literature is for. How is reading literature for pleasure related to reading literature for an English course? What kind of understanding or knowledge comes from “close reading” or “reading against the grain”? What is the role of literature in community formation, in cultural memory, and in historical reflection? What is its role as an archive of emotions, as a forum for thinking through personal and broad social experiences, and as a vision of the future? We will explore such questions through a diverse set of works in poetry and prose. In the course of this exploration, you will develop your ability to discuss literary forms and genres, the role of audiences, literary allusion and tradition, terms and methods for cultural analysis, and other foundational skills of literary analysis.

Readings will range widely from Shakespeare to Jesmyn Ward, including a number of works by U-M’s distinguished creative writers, past and present.

Course Requirements:

Requirements include several short written assignments; two essays; and informed, curious, and thoughtful contributions to class discussion.

ENGLISH 298 - Introduction to Literary Studies
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
23336
Open
25
 
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TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
002 (REC)
P
27158
Open
25
 
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MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
003 (REC)
P
11411
Open
25
 
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TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
004 (REC)
P
11412
Open
25
 
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
005 (REC)
P
18778
Open
25
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
006 (REC)
P
11410
Open
25
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
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