ENGLISH 508 - Discourse and Rhetoric
Section: 001 Digital Rhetorics: Community, Method, Mode
Term: WN 2018
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
Credits:
3
Consent:
With permission of department.
Advisory Prerequisites:
ENGLISH 506. Graduate standing.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

During our time together, we will examine the whatness and whyness of digital rhetorics, plural: as a field, as a diffuse body of work, and as a series of methodologies, practices, and ways of knowing and being in the world. In particular, we will consider what digital rhetorics afford as well as what and who they elide. If rhetoric, as Jay Dolmage describes, represents the circulation of power through discourse, then how might we ethically direct our attention within digital communities and spaces? Our conversations will draw from rhetoric scholarship on relationality and materiality, and we will work together to interrogate how mediated forms, including mediated scholarship, frame access, oppression, identity, and knowledge. As a means of working through these questions, we will work with code and a number of digital composing tools, including HTML, CSS, and blogging platforms.

This class does not require any background in rhetoric, digital studies, or multimodal composing. We will learn together! While rhetoric is our organizing topic, this class will be of interest to anyone who is digital-curious (or rhetoric-curious!), especially those looking to learn more about digital studies and/or multimedia composing.

Readings may include selections from Vee’s Coding Literacy, Chun’s Updating to Remain the Same, Eyman’s Digital Rhetoric, Rhodes & Alexander’s Techne: Queer Meditations on Writing the Self, Adam Banks’s Digital Griots, and Arola & Wysocki’s Composing Media = Composing Embodiment.

ENGLISH 508 - Discourse and Rhetoric
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
P
27170
Open
12
 
-
M 4:00PM - 7:00PM
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