ENGLISH 647 - Topics in the Victorian Period
Section: 001 The Problem of Poverty
Term: WN 2018
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
Credits:
3
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Consent:
With permission of department.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Graduate standing.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course will explore the ways in which poverty was represented in nineteenth-century British fiction and non-fiction prose. We will compare well-known novels with the 'slum fiction' of Walter Besant, George Gissing, Arthur Morrison, and Margaret Harkness, and we will also consider the broader culture of poverty as it was depicted in the writings of Henry Mayhew, Thomas Carlyle, John Ruskin, and William Morris along with Punch and other print media (including photographs). The aim is to develop an understanding of the social problem of the time: namely, poverty and its relation to the languages of class.

ENGLISH 647 - Topics in the Victorian Period
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
34298
Closed
0
 
-
M 5:00PM - 8:00PM
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