HISTORY 328 - Humanities Topics in History
Section: 004 Colonial Capitalism and U.S. Empire
Term: WN 2018
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Repeatability:
May be elected five times for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course examines a history of capitalism through the perspective of race and colonialism. In particular, it draws from multiple intellectual genealogies including the black radical tradition, anti-colonial critique, and anti-imperial historical works. We will begin by looking at settler colonialism and racial slavery in the making of the modern world economic system, placing emphasis on how U.S. imperialism is forged within and from these global conditions. We then explore the global histories of violence, inequality, and marginalization of a world structured by colonial capitalism. Simultaneously this course traces the intellectual, political, and social movements that emerged to challenge such systemic and structural oppressions.

The texts will draw from, on one hand, historical scholarship and social theory, and on the other hand, cultural archives and primary sources of the twentieth century. For every class meeting students are expected to be prepared with all the readings as well as short essays that articulate their critical reflections on the theories and historical content of the assigned texts. The richness of class discussion and dialogue will be highly dependent upon students having read the material and written about the texts in a thoughtful and scholarly matter. Since we meet only once a week, attendance and preparedness is crucial to passing this course. Through collectively studying these histories, students will gain a greater understanding and generate more critical insight into the workings and operations of colonial, capitalist, racial, and imperial structures of power.

Course Requirements:

Class participation, weekly response papers, mid-term long essay, and a final long essay.

Intended Audience:

Upper-level undergraduates. Introductory knowledge of U.S. and international history in the 20th century is strongly suggested.

Class Format:

Discussion-based Seminar

HISTORY 328 - Humanities Topics in History
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
P
25399
Open
30
 
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
Note: Section 001: For Spanish Majors, this course counts as a 300-level cognate.
002 (LEC)
P
25641
Open
20
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
003 (LEC)
P
30923
Open
35
 
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
004 (LEC)
P
30924
Open
35
 
-
Tu 1:00PM - 4:00PM
005 (LEC)
P
31759
Open
80
 
-
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
006 (LEC)
P
32601
Open
25
 
-
MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
010 (LEC)
 
30604
Open
50
 
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
011 (DIS)
P
30605
Open
25
 
-
Th 12:00PM - 1:00PM
012 (DIS)
P
30606
Open
25
 
-
Th 1:00PM - 2:00PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.


ISBN: 9780807848296
Black marxism : the making of the Black radical tradition, Author: Robinson, Cedric J., Publisher: University of North Carolina Press 2000
Required
ISBN: 9780802141323
The wretched of the earth, Author: Fanon, Frantz., Publisher: Grove Press 2011
Required
ISBN: 1781681589
The poorer nations : a possible history of the Global South, Author: Prashad, Vijay., Publisher: Verso 2014
Required
ISBN: 1429952253
Spreading the american dream : american economic and cultural expansion, 1890-1945, Author: Rosenberg, Emily., Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2013
Required
ISBN: 022645911X
Bankers and empire : how Wall Street colonized the Caribbean, Author: Hudson, Peter James,
Required
ISBN: 1844679454
The making of global capitalism : the political economy of american empire, Author: Panitch, Leo., Publisher: Verso 2014
Required
ISBN: 0511817991
The global Cold War : third world interventions and the making of our times, Author: Westad, Odd Arne
Required
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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