INTLSTD 401 - International Studies Advanced Seminar
Section: 004 Achieving Liberalization: Influences and Issues in Postwar Democratization
Term: WN 2018
Subject: International Studies (INTLSTD)
Department: LSA II: International and Comparative Studies
Credits:
3
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Enforced Prerequisites:
Junior standing or above.
Repeatability:
May be elected twice for credit.
Primary Instructor:

This course explores the postwar transition of governments to democratic institutions throughout the 20th and the 21st century. Numerous peacekeeping operations and military interventions have sought to create institutions that will afford citizens the opportunity to participate in government. The reasoning behind this is straightforward: scholars and policymakers agree that democratic institutions should be solution to prevent recurring violence. The outcome of these efforts, however, has been a difficult lesson: an effective transition is much more complicated than just holding an election or rotating leadership. A number of factors - such as socio-economic development, historical experience, and trust - can influence the process against democratization. The first part of this course will address these debates and reflect on how they contribute to our understanding of whether democratic institutions can take root. The second part of the course will address the institutional changes that become necessary in an effort to build a democracy. In transitioning a government, the actors involved will have to:

  1. design power-sharing arrangements among factions,
  2. engage in constitutional negotiations,
  3. tackle rampant corruption,
  4. address the demands of an emerging civil society, and
  5. establish the rule of law.

Examples discussed will include Haiti, the Weimar Republic, Japan, Mozambique, Angola, and Afghanistan. In this course, students will critically assess theories of democratic transitions, the various ensuing institutional changes, and historical case studies to arrive at a deeper understanding of the theoretical and policy implications for liberalizing the state after a major conflict. Essentially, students taking this course will become experts in one transition through three assignments: first, students will produce an annotated bibliography to establish their knowledge; second, give a research presentation to explain their case to peers; and third, offer policy recommendations on how to learn from or fix the situation.

Course Requirements:

Students will produce an annotated bibliography, give a research presentation, and offer policy recommendations.

Intended Audience:

International Studies Majors and Minors

Class Format:

Class focuses on lectures and in class discussions.

INTLSTD 401 - International Studies Advanced Seminar
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
P
18851
Open
25
25LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
002 (SEM)
P
20957
Open
25
25LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
003 (SEM)
P
20958
Open
25
25LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM
004 (SEM)
P
25852
Open
25
25LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
006 (SEM)
P
27553
Open
25
25LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
007 (SEM)
P
31050
Open
25
25LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
Th 10:00AM - 1:00PM
009 (SEM)
P
31201
Open
28
8LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
010 (SEM)
P
27774
Open
25
5LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
011 (SEM)
P
31372
Open
25
5LSA INT'L STUDIES MAJ & MIN
-
MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
NOTE: Data maintained by department in Wolverine Access. If no textbooks are listed below, check with the department.
Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

Click the button below to view historical syllabi for INTLSTD 401 (UM login required)

View Historical Syllabi
The CourseProfile (ART) system, supported by the U-M Provost’s 3rd Century Initiative through a grant to the Digital Innovation Greenhouse, provides additional information about: course enrollments; academic terms and instructors; student academic profiles (school/college, majors), and previous, concurrent, and subsequent course enrollments.

CourseProfile (ART)