POLSCI 389 - Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section: 002 "Empire of Liberty": The Politics of US Colonialism
Term: WN 2018
Subject: Political Science (POLSCI)
Department: LSA Political Science
Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
SS
Waitlist Capacity:
99
Advisory Prerequisites:
One course in Political Science.
Repeatability:
May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit(s). May be elected more than once in the same term.
Primary Instructor:

The United States is a democracy. The United States is an empire. How can both be true? Whereas democracy implies government by consent and popular will, empire designates the use of conquest and coercion to subordinate people to external forces. In this course, we will explore how imperial ideas and practices have influenced American democratic development. Untangling this persistent paradox of the co-existence of empire and democracy in American political discourse and practice, we will ask: How have ideas like race, property, indigeneity, and gender shaped the politics of American democracy and vice-versa? How have non-European peoples encountered enslavement and conquest and imagined their own notions of freedom and political association against and within an emerging and consolidating democratic nation in the 18th and 19th centuries? What differences and similarities exist between the U.S. and Europe and other New World “creole” nations in this regard? And how do ideas of American exceptionalism and civic nationalism that downplay imperial and colonial histories shape current debates about American politics and the place of the United States in the global order? Readings include: John Locke, Thomas Jefferson, William Apess (Pequot), David Walker, Alexis de Tocqueville, Elias Boudinot (Cherokee), W.E.B. Du Bois, Abraham Lincoln, and Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani.

This course is offered in the Political Theory subfield.

Course Requirements:

Weekly mini-response posts; mid-term and final exams; final group presentation; attendance required

Intended Audience:

There are no formal pre-requisites, but students would benefit from having taken POLSCI 306 (American Political Thought: Early) and POLSCI 307 (American Political Thought: Later).

Class Format:

Twice a week for a mix of lecture and small- and large-group discussion.

POLSCI 389 - Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
25692
Open
80
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
002 (REC)
P
31005
Open
40
 
-
MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM
003 (REC)
P
31043
Open
40
 
-
W 9:00AM - 12:00PM
004 (REC)
P
23258
Open
80
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
005 (REC)
P
31066
Open
50
 
-
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
006 (REC)
P
31294
Open
25
 
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
007 (REC)
P
28556
Open
80
 
-
M 6:00PM - 9:00PM
008 (REC)
P
32609
Open
50
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
040 (LEC)
 
33785
Open
30
 
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
041 (DIS)
P
33789
Open
10
 
-
Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
042 (DIS)
P
33790
Open
10
 
-
Th 5:00PM - 6:00PM
043 (DIS)
P
33791
Open
10
 
-
F 9:00AM - 10:00AM
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