SI 605 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Section: 001 This course will focus on how to enhance local (or regional) production, sale and consumption of fruits and vegetables within the United States, with a particular focus on Michigan and the Great Lakes region. Classes will primarily operate as discovery sessions with industry, governmental, and academic experts. The course culminates with students creating, and presenting to a team of experts and/or stakeholders, a business or operational plan proposing their solution.
Term: WN 2018
Subject: Information (SI)
Department: School of Information
Credits:
3 (Non-LSA credit).
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Graduate/Professional Standing.
Repeatability:
May be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:
Instructor:

"Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.

SI 605 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Schedule Listing
001 (LAB)
P
33200
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Tu 4:10PM - 6:10PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). This problem solving course will challenge a multidisciplinary team of students to address a real-world problem in the area of sustainable food systems. Food: what we eat, how and where we produce it, where we buy it, and who has access to it has profound effects on human health, economies, and the environment. The current US food system, which delivers abundant, "cheap" and "safe" food to millions of people has embedded in it practices, polices, and outcomes that are not sustainable or desirable at a societal level. From water shortages and tainted drinking water to diet-related diseases and environmental costs, sustainability in food systems is critical to communities, nations, and our species. This course will focus on one particular problem: how to enhance local (or regional) production, sale and consumption of fruits and vegetables within the United States, with a particular focus on Michigan and the Great Lakes region. Classes will primarily operate as discovery sessions with industry, governmental, and academic experts. The course culminates with students creating, and presenting to a team of experts and/or stakeholders, a business or operational plan proposing their solution. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between October 23, 2017, and November 3, 2017.
002 (LAB)
P
33206
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Tu 4:10PM - 6:10PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Meeting renewable portfolios standards and expanding renewable energy markets requires overcoming numerous technological, societal, and legal hurdles. In this course, students will briefly examine these and the myriad other challenges facing renewable energy markets and then generate solutions to address one of those challenges. Renewable energy offers the promise of energy security and reduced greenhouse gas emissions that are critical to climate change mitigation efforts in the United States and throughout the world. Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia impose minimum renewable energy standards on their utilities' generation portfolios; eight states have renewable energy goals. The most ambitious standard is in Hawaii, which seeks to meet 100 percent of its energy needs from renewable sources by 2045, followed by Vermont (75 percent by 2032), California (50 percent by 2030), and the District of Columbia (50 percent by 2032). In Michigan, the renewable portfolio standard will be 15 percent in 2021. Challenges facing renewable energy markets include an antiquated electricity transmission network geared to local generation and distribution that does not readily accommodate transmission of renewable energy from states where there is abundant supply to population centers; management of the electricity grid to provide stability in the face of the intermittent nature of renewable energy at limited scale; having sufficient storage capacity for renewable energy so that electricity is available at peak periods of demand; and ensuring price competitiveness of renewable energy through a combination of monetary and fiscal policy, while avoiding regressive impacts and geographical cost disparities. Addressing these challenges will require modification to existing laws and regulations. Classes will include discovery sessions with industry, governmental, and academic experts. At the end of the term, students will present an integrated proposal to an expert review panel. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between October 23, 2017, and November 3, 2017.
003 (LAB)
P
33212
Closed
0
 
-
W 3:15PM - 4:15PM
W 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Working as a group with guidance from the instructors, students will develop a plan to address how the lack of social capital among inner-city entrepreneurs impedes the development of viable businesses and successful entrepreneurs and prevents the development of a healthy entrepreneurial ecosystem in inner cities. We will focus on innovative, community-based solutions to this problem. Students will work collaboratively across disciplines to understand the current situation, explore current best practices, and create a plan to present to a hypothetical organization such as a state or local government, a foundation, a non-profit organization, or a public-private partnership. Class sessions will focus heavily on interactive discussion, presentations, and interviews with experts. Students will be expected to spend significant time outside of class working in teams to interview relevant stakeholders, conduct research, draft documents and develop the plan. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between October 23, 2017, and November 3, 2017.
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