HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Section: 003 American Dreamscapes: The Power of Neighborhoods in U.S. Politics and Culture
Term: FA 2018
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Other Course Info:
This course may not be included in a History major. F.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Every day we are bombarded with references to “the neighborhood.” We are often quite sure of what makes a good or bad neighborhood, or a desirable neighbor. We fondly remember Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, and continue to watch Steve Ditko and Stan Lee’s friendly neighborhood Spider-Man swing from New York’s buildings. We listen raptly to references to zip codes and street names in popular songs. Why are we so invested in the idea of neighborhood? What, if anything, does it mean? Why does it so often drive our cultural products and political rhetoric? This course will address these questions by exploring the ways in which the nation is shaped at the local level, from ethnic and racial identity formation to mass political mobilization to the everyday freedom and autonomy facilitated by community belonging. At the same time, we will examine the often-contentious relationship between neighborhood and state by studying topics from segregation, displacement, and urban renewal, to tourism, gentrification and political campaigns. We will consider neighborhoods as American Dreamscapes, malleable entities that are at once imagined and material, constructed to suit specific political, cultural and economic interests.

Students will gain experience in a variety of writing genres, and will be introduced to history as a practice. Students will write assignments based on course readings, oral histories, film and television, and archival documents.

Class Format:

The course format is discussion driven with daily writing activities. There are no exams. Students will be evaluated on writing assignments and class discussion. Each week through readings and writing exercises, we will investigate the creation of local space in U.S. cities and suburbs, and problematize conceptions of the local to highlight its broader national and transnational significance.

HISTORY 195 - The Writing of History
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
P
11464
Open
11
 
12Enrollment Management
-
WF 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Note: ALL SECTIONS OF HISTORY 195 ARE RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.
002 (REC)
P
11465
Open
11
 
12Enrollment Management
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
003 (REC)
P
19558
Open
12
 
12Enrollment Management
-
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
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