PUBHLTH 741 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Section: 004 We face a failure of public trust in sources of truth about matters of fact. Public actors lie and accuse each other of lying. Media outlets present competing narratives. People do not know whom to trust or believe. Misinformation and conspiracy theories spread via social media. Drawing from psychology, communications, journalism, social media, information, computer science, law, and history and other relevant fields, our aim is to identify concrete potential solutions or avenues that might help people identify and trust sources of truth and/or that might mitigate the spread of misinformation.
Term: FA 2018
Subject: Public Health (PUBHLTH)
Department: SPH Public Health

"Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.

PUBHLTH 741 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Schedule Listing
001 (LAB)
P
32198
Open
6
 
-
W 3:15PM - 4:15PM
W 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). The class will use the experience of the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) to develop a plan for countering the ways in which extremist groups use social media to instigate acts of violence. The class structure will be collaborative and multidisciplinary. Class time will focus on providing background information on, and discussion about, the problem. Students will spend additional time outside of class meeting in groups, thinking through the problem, and doing research in the service of the final class project, which they will present at the end of the semester to an expert review panel. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between February 23, 2018, and March 16, 2018.
002 (LAB)
P
32205
Closed
0
 
-
W 3:15PM - 4:15PM
W 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). This course will challenge students to develop creative approaches to reducing the risk of brain injury in youth and high school football. Students will work in multi-disciplinary teams, under the guidance of the instructors, to conceive and propose novel solutions that draw on insights from law, engineering, medicine, business, ethics, and other relevant fields. Each student team will address a specific sub-topic relative to the course theme. Sub-topics may include: What changes in the rules governing practices, participation, and play should be instituted? What kinds of protective and monitoring equipment should be used, and under what protocols? How should such equipment be financed and distributed? Class time will focus on providing background information and discussion with topical experts. Students are expected to spend additional time outside of class contacting experts and researching scientific and lay materials. At the end of the term, students will present a proposal to an expert review panel. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between February 23, 2018, and March 16, 2018.
003 (LAB)
P
32212
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Tu 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). This problem solving course will challenge a multidisciplinary team of students to address a real-world problem in the rapidly-evolving connected and automated vehicle landscape. The Detroit Metro area and the University of Michigan are leading the world in research and deploying technological advances in vehicle connectivity and automation. The potential benefits of "driverless cars" are widely understood, but the path to getting from the current state of human driving to a world of interconnected and "self-driving" vehicles entails an overwhelming confluence of technological, societal, legal, regulatory, political, and business problems. This course will focus on one particular angle: the potential multiple problems created by the unavoidable future interactions between automated vehicles and other road users, such as non-automated, human-driven vehicles, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Classes will be run as discovery sessions with industry, governmental, and academic experts. Students working in multidisciplinary sub-teams will dive deeply into particular aspects of the problem with the course culminating in the creation of an integrated class deliverable in the form of a business or operational plan proposing concrete solutions to the problem. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between February 23, 2018, and March 16, 2018.
004 (LAB)
P
32219
Closed
0
 
-
W 3:15PM - 4:15PM
W 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). We are facing what might be described as a failure or crisis of public trust in sources of truth about matters of fact. Public actors lie and accuse each other of lying. Media outlets present competing narratives. People do not know whom to trust or believe. Misinformation and conspiracy theories spread through social media. Our aim in this course will be to identify concrete potential interventions, solutions, or avenues for future exploration that might help people identify and trust sources of truth and/or that might mitigate the spread of misinformation. We will draw in insights from a range of inter-connected fields, including (but not limited to): psychology, communications, journalism, social media, information, computer science, law, and history. At the end of the term, students will present a proposal to an expert panel. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between February 23, 2018, and March 16, 2018.
005 (LAB)
P
32226
Open
1
 
-
Tu 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Tu 4:30PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). In India -- as in many parts of the world -- economic growth and development have been key focus areas for successive governments. However, development often generates costs that force us to address difficult tradeoffs stemming from certain policies and reforms, such as the possible advantages to enhancing economic well-being versus the potential threats to the environment and heritage preservation. For example, although India has obtained substantial economic growth in the last two decades, there has also been deterioration in several aspects of India's heritage, as only a small fraction of pre-colonial monuments in India receive federal protection and many of these (including many iconic Indian sites) face threats from demolition, desecration, decay, pollution, and other perils. In this problem solving course, we will focus on these kinds of issues in the Indian context and explore what the role of the law and other disciplines are, and could be, in mediating and balancing these concerns in concrete contexts. We will first survey the salient features of India's Constitution and polity and gauge the state of its economy and its environment. This will involve examining laws and policies related to property, judicial process, contract, tourism, historic preservation, and intellectual property amongst others. Along with this, we will examine theories and practices of historic preservation and consider the protection of, and pressures on, monuments and sites, as well as other aspects of India's heritage (e.g., traditional knowledge). Thereafter, we will focus on an imperiled landscape in western India where 500 medieval temples stand around the periphery of a reservoir. We will conceptualize solutions that might promote its holistic renewal and serve as guidelines for the preservation of other sites of historical significance. Class time will focus on providing background information and discussion with topical experts, such as archaeologists, attorneys, top bureaucrats, environmentalists, journalists, urban planners, and other stakeholders. Students are expected to spend additional time outside class contacting experts and performing research. At the end of the term, students will present a proposal to an expert review panel. This is a prof pick class and is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Students may apply for the course by submitting the required application materials to the PSI registration site (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) between February 23, 2018, and March 16, 2018.
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