COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Fall 2020, Section 001 - Body Politics/Body Poetics
Instruction Mode: Section 001 is  Online (see other Sections below)
Subject: Comparative Literature (COMPLIT)
Department: LSA Comparative Literature
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Details

Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
FYWR
Other:
WorldLit
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Description

How are our bodies composed and perceived? How are our bodies liberated and controlled, celebrated and stigmatized? How do we live our bodies and the intersecting identities that shape those bodies? In this class, we will explore the politics of the body, as influenced by factors like race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability. We’ll ask how that politics can become a kind of poetics. We’ll also ask how authors and performers from various times and places, from ancient Greece and Rome to modern day America, use poetry to think through the body and vice versa. Using texts ranging from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, to Martha Graham’s journals and modern dances, to Claudia Rankine’s Citizen, we will think about the body as a site of translation, about the poetics of dance, and about embodiment and representations of the body in poetry.

In this course, you will learn to create complex, analytic, well-supported arguments as well as hone your critical thinking and reading skills. Through a progressing series of paper assignments, you will be asked to think about what it means to read and write the body, while practicing key techniques of academic writing such as close reading, narrative argument, and comparative analysis. In the final project for this course, you will be asked to repurpose one of your written essays into a new form (a performance, a visual project, a blog or other kind of digital presentation, etc.), in an effort to consider the very distinctions we make between texts and other kinds of media.

Course Requirements:

This course will make use of a grading contract determined at the beginning of the semester between each student and the course instructor. Students will receive a document outlining of all of the course components required to receive a B in the course (essay completion and revision, peer review, participation and discussion, self-reflection, etc.) as well as a range of options that they can choose to complete in order to receive an A in the course (optional synchronous meetings, additional revision and reflection assignments, community engagement opportunities, etc.). Each student will be expected to follow the plan for success that they outline in the grading contract (with the understanding that the contract allows for flexibility, changing circumstances, and differences in student needs throughout the semester), and final grades will be assigned based on the work the student completes.

Class Format:

This course will primarily use Canvas for all asynchronous online components. We may also occasionally use Google forms and docs for collaborative work. Optional synchronous meetings with the instructor will be conducted through Zoom every Wednesday from 8:30-10am. Students should have access to a camera and microphone, especially for small group/breakout group work, but while students are encouraged they will not be required to turn on cameras during the synchronous meetings.

Schedule

COMPLIT 122 - Writing World Literatures
Schedule Listing
001 (REC)
 Online
29687
Closed
0
 
-
WF 8:30AM - 10:00AM
002 (REC)
  Hybrid
21884
Closed
0
 
-
F 10:00AM - 11:30AM
W 10:00AM - 11:30AM
003 (REC)
  Hybrid
18179
Closed
0
 
-
W 11:30AM - 1:00PM
F 11:30AM - 1:00PM
004 (REC)
  Hybrid
19020
Open
1
 
-
Tu 8:30AM - 10:00AM
Th 8:30AM - 10:00AM
005 (REC)
 Online
19842
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
006 (REC)
 Online
27046
Closed
0
 
-
MW 4:00PM - 5:30PM

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)