ENGLISH 292 - Topics in Language and Literature
Winter 2022, Section 006 - Poetry and Sound
Instruction Mode: Section 006 is  Online (see other Sections below)
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
See additional student enrollment and course instructor information to guide you in your decision making.

Details

Credits:
2
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Other:
Minicourse
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Repeatability:
May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.
Primary Instructor:

Description

Poetry is indeed a little mysterious; just look at this handful of quotations that try to describe what it is, what it does: “Poetry is language at its most distilled and most powerful.” (Rita Dove) “Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood.” (T.S. Eliot) “Like a piece of ice on a hot stove the poem must ride on its own melting.” (Robert Frost) “Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance.” (Carl Sandburg) “The poet is the priest of the invisible.” (Wallace Stevens) “If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.” (Emily Dickinson) This introductory-level class will take on the mystery of poetry in such a way that will strive to make it more accessible by developing clear strategies for reading poems—with a special focus on the role that sound plays in how poems do what they do to us. (Consider rhyme and meter most obviously—but also other, less defined ways that the sounds of language help to shape meaning.) The reading strategies we practice will help you engage with poetry’s strangeness which, for many people, is easy to dismiss as illegible or unimportant. But poetry’s strangeness, of course, reflects important strangenesses in the world around us, strangenesses we can choose to explore or ignore. We’ll start our work with a pair of crucial assumptions about reading poems: 1. Poetry is not a code to crack, and 2. Poems can’t be made out to mean whatever you want them to mean. Our mode will be primarily interpretive, and indeed just what it means to interpret and just how to know when you’re doing it well and when you’re being sloppy about it will constantly be on our radar as we do this work. Simply put, our class will be devoted to the act of reading poems together, during every class meeting, in order to practice and explore as a group the endeavor of deep, careful reading.

Schedule

ENGLISH 292 - Topics in Language and Literature
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 In Person
24278
Open
7
 
-
MW 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Meets 01/05/2022-02/22/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 01/18/22)
002 (LEC)
 In Person
30078
Closed
0
 
-
MW 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)
003 (LEC)
  Hybrid
35310
Closed
0
 
-
Th 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Note: -
004 (LEC)
 Online
37348
Closed
0
 
-
MW 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Note: Meets 01/05/2022-02/22/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 01/18/22)
005 (LEC)
 Online
37349
Closed
0
 
-
MW 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)
006 (LEC)
 Online
37529
Open
5
 
-
TuTh 4:00PM - 6:00PM
Note: Meets 01/05/2022-02/22/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 01/18/22)
007 (LEC)
 Online
37530
Open
8
 
-
Tu 4:00PM - 6:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)
008 (LEC)
 Online
42086
Closed
0
 
-
MW 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)