ENGLISH 292 - Topics in Language and Literature
Winter 2022, Section 007 - Poetry and Form
Instruction Mode: Section 007 is  Online (see other Sections below)
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
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Details

Credits:
1
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Other:
Minicourse
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Repeatability:
May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.
Primary Instructor:

Description

You probably know what a sonnet is—at least generally speaking. (Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?) You’ve likely read a haiku or two (The old pond / a frog jumps in / the sound of water) and maybe heard a limerick that made you blush (I once had a friend in Nantucket…) But these poetic forms are just a few of many: We also have sestinas and villanelles, odes and aubades, elegies and ekphrastics, tankas and ghazals and prayers—oh my! This introductory level class—which fits perfectly with English 292.006: Poetry and Sound, but can be taken on its own as well—will introduce you to a number of poetic forms in order to engage the question: What does the form of a poem do for the meanings and messages it suggests? How might knowing about these forms help us be better readers of poetry? After a crash course on some big-picture principles about engaging poetry generally, we’ll move from class to class looking at poems grouped by form—a group of sonnets, a group of haikus, some sestinas, some villanelles… And while we won’t confine ourselves to reading these poems solely through the lens of form, form, as our organizing principle, will be the idea we keep coming back to in our conversations about how these poems do their work. 


Students will write one major paper as well as regular, weekly exercises, and we just might have some time for you to compose one or two original poems of your own. Class meetings will be full of discussion, experimentation, and in-class writing, with minimal lecturing by me; I’m a strong believer in learning by doing, and I think about a class like this as not that different from a science lab—except that when you come to class, you’ll find poems on the dissection table rather than fish or frogs, and the theories and principles we’ll test together will be about language and image and the rules of poetic forms. You learn best about poetry by getting into it yourself, getting your hands dirty—not having someone like me tell you what to think; my primary goal is to teach you how to think rather than what to think. By the end of class I would hope that you find yourself thinking about how to start investigating poems by looking at how they’re structured—but I also hope you’ll start thinking about structure itself in new ways. Sometimes rules are good for us; shape can give things definition; and limitations or restrictions (even when they’re arbitrary or seem so) might provide just what we need to build something we may never have thought of on our own.

Schedule

ENGLISH 292 - Topics in Language and Literature
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 In Person
24278
Open
7
 
-
MW 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Meets 01/05/2022-02/22/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 01/18/22)
002 (LEC)
 In Person
30078
Closed
0
 
-
MW 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)
003 (LEC)
  Hybrid
35310
Closed
0
 
-
Th 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Note: -
004 (LEC)
 Online
37348
Closed
0
 
-
MW 10:00AM - 12:00PM
Note: Meets 01/05/2022-02/22/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 01/18/22)
005 (LEC)
 Online
37349
Closed
0
 
-
MW 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)
006 (LEC)
 Online
37529
Open
5
 
-
TuTh 4:00PM - 6:00PM
Note: Meets 01/05/2022-02/22/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 01/18/22)
007 (LEC)
 Online
37530
Open
8
 
-
Tu 4:00PM - 6:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)
008 (LEC)
 Online
42086
Closed
0
 
-
MW 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Note: Meets 03/07/2022-04/19/2022 (Drop/Add Deadline: 03/21/22)

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

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