ANTHRCUL 254 - The Anthropology of Food
Fall 2022, Section 001
Instruction Mode: Section 001 is  In Person (see other Sections below)
Subject: Anthropology, Cultural (ANTHRCUL)
Department: LSA Anthropology
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Details

Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
SS
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Description

Do you eat to live, or live to eat? If the latter, this course may be for you. As anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss wrote, the plants and animals around us are not just good to eat, they are good to think with and through. Anthropologists study the human condition in all its forms, including how we evolved as a species, how we communicate, how we lived in the historic and prehistoric past, and how we organize our lives in different parts of the world today. In the realm of food, we thus pay close attention to the ways in which humans hunt, fish, gather, and grow food, how we get enough calories to survive in differing environments, how food helps us to constitute families, religious identities, and other social networks, and even how food comes to be a source and a symptom of social inequality. We will address all of these issues, as well as the symbolic uses and meanings of food in sacred and everyday contexts. Students read articles and chapters that are the result of all of the listed methods, and they evaluate which ones are most effective at making different sorts of arguments. Students are also introduced to readings from history, neuroscience, and human geography, allowing them to see different ways that the study of human culture and society draws sociocultural anthropologists into conversation with people working in other anthropological subfields and neighboring disciplines.

Course Requirements:

The main product of the semester is an ethnographic essay on some aspect of each student's Thanksgiving experience (35% of the final grade). Another short paper counts for 15%. Most reading will be done using the Perusall annotation platform, and grades from Perusall will make up 25% of the grade. Finally, there will be five small exercises that will count for a total of 25% of the grade.

Intended Audience:

This class should appeal to undergraduate students from all social science and humanities disciplines. It is open to students from all majors, has no prerequisites, and would not put non-majors at any disadvantage.

Class Format:

The class will meet for two 1 hour 30 minute lectures each week, and one hour-long discussion section. 

Schedule

ANTHRCUL 254 - The Anthropology of Food
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 In Person
26846
Closed
0
 
3
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
002 (DIS)
 In Person
26847
Closed
0
 
-
M 2:00PM - 3:00PM
003 (DIS)
 In Person
26848
Closed
0
 
-
M 3:00PM - 4:00PM
004 (DIS)
 In Person
26849
Closed
0
 
3
W 4:00PM - 5:00PM

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)