ENGLISH 140 - First-Year Seminar on English Language and Literature
Fall 2022, Section 001 - Poetry and Attention
Instruction Mode: Section 001 is  In Person (see other Sections below)
Subject: English Language and Literature (ENGLISH)
Department: LSA English Language & Literature
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Details

Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Other:
FYSem
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Consent:
With permission of instructor.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Description

It is not unusual to hear that poetry requires more than the usual amount of our attention:  we need to slow down to read it; we need to pay attention to its form; it asks more from us than other forms of writing.  Indeed, in the early twentieth century and after, scholars, writers, and teachers started touting poetry as a kind of attention shaper -- "a machine made out of words,” as William Carlos Williams put it, that aims to shape and test not just what we attend to, but how.  In this class, we think historically and theoretically about twentieth century poetry’s reputation as attention training, and we practice reading poems together with that kind of attention in play. How do various poems, and poetry reading norms, ask us to pay attention?  While much of what we’ll do will involve practicing a variety of college classroom tools to practice different ways of attending to poems – close reading and research -- we will also look at prose writing (from popular science, literary criticism, history) to help us think together about what attention is, and why it (and distraction) are such a hot topics now.  How does a digital age recast poetry in light of new attention-shaping media such as the algorithm or smartphones?  Does our world still support the expectations and meanings of attention that a pre-internet age advanced? 

Students will read and research in and out of class, learn to write close readings of poems, will try to write in at least one traditional form of poetry, and will memorize poems to perform in class.  They will also write a longer final research paper, literary-critical essay, or digital project. Most readings will be provided digitally on Canvas; students may be asked to buy one or two books.  

Schedule

ENGLISH 140 - First-Year Seminar on English Language and Literature
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
 In Person
28872
Open
5
6Y1
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
002 (SEM)
 In Person
23333
Closed
0
 
6Enrollment Management
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM
003 (SEM)
 In Person
23334
Closed
0
 
6Enrollment Management
-
MW 8:30AM - 10:00AM
005 (SEM)
 In Person
24750
Closed
0
2Y1
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Click the button below to view and buy textbooks for ENGLISH 140.001

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Syllabi

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)