LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, Fall 2017, Subject = ANTHRBIO

What does it mean to be human? Where did we come from? Where have we been? Where can we go? Anthropology is the field of study that investigates all of this and so much more.

Anthropology is the home of concepts like culture, ethnography, and fieldwork, borrowed around the globe by those needing to understand the nuance of everyday life. Anthropology is the study of language, meaning and thought, in action. Anthropology is where you start for archaeological investigations of big picture changes in biology, society and culture over time. It moves from the deep human past to the fraught, undocumented realities of lives unfolding today. Anthropology is the launch pad for understanding the evolution of human and non-human primates through the study of adaptation, genetics, behavior, and ecology, the bases for mapping out the contours and limits of human uniqueness.

The subject matter of anthropology is made up of four sub-fields: Anthropological Archaeology (ANTHRARC), Biological Anthropology (ANTHRBIO), Linguistic Anthropology and Sociocultural Anthropology (ANTHRCUL).

Sociocultural Anthropology describes, analyzes, and interprets the full range of human social relations and cultural forms. It looks at kinship, gender, religion, politics, economy, and artistic traditions, all with the goal of understanding how they work, why they differ across time and space, and how they change on local and global scales.

Linguistic Anthropology studies language as a form of social action. It looks at how language makes us who we are, and how we make language what it is. It considers language in the context of human evolution, social relationships, and cultural forms, and it explores the role of languages and ways of speaking in creating, sustaining, and undermining social divisions.

Anthropological Archaeology seeks to understand the human past by examining the remains of human activities. Through analyses of material culture, anthropological archeologists explore changes in the social, economic, and symbolic organization of human societies over time.

Biological Anthropology investigates human evolutionary history, the causes of present-day genetic diversity, and the biology of human behavior. It is multidisciplinary, drawing on genetics, paleontology, developmental biology, primate behavior, nutrition, and ecology.

Roster of Anthropology courses, by subgroup

  • Anthropological Archaeology:
    ANTHRARC 180, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 292, 296, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 388, 390, 392, 394, 407, 442, 482, 483, 484, 488, 489, 490, 491, 492, 493, 495
  • Biological Anthropology:
    ANTHRBIO 166, 168, 169, 201, 297, 342, 351, 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 368, 369, 373, 450, 451, 452, 460, 461, 462, 465, 466, 467, 469, 472, 473, 474, 475, 477, 478, 479
  • Sociocultural Anthropology:
    • Introductory Courses:
      ANTHRCUL 101, 158, 222, 226, 256, 272, 298, 299
    • Sociocultural Anthropology  —  Regional Courses:
      ANTHRCUL 202, 209, 302, 305, 306, 309, 310, 314, 315, 317, 319, 320, 323, 346, 402, 403, 404, 405, 408, 409, 411, 414, 415, 417, 423
    • Sociocultural Anthropology  —  Theory/Method:
      ANTHRCUL 230, 246, 327, 328, 330, 331, 332, 338, 342, 352, 374
    • Sociocultural Anthropology  —  Topical Courses:
      ANTHRCUL 212, 232, 250, 254, 260, 325, 333, 334, 337, 339, 342, 343, 344, 345, 347, 349, 354, 356, 357, 427, 428, 436, 438, 439, 440, 445, 446, 450, 451, 453, 455, 457, 458, 461, 462, 464
    • Linguistic Anthropology:
      ANTHRCUL 272, 299, 370, 372, 373, 374, 375, 461, 462, 464, 471, 473, 474, 475, 477
  • Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses
    • ANTHRARC 258, 398, 399, 480, 487, 494, 496, 497, 499
    • ANTHRBIO 370, 371, 398, 399, 471
    • ANTHRCUL 258, 398, 399, 499

Anthropology Department Waitlist Policy

http://lsa.umich.edu/anthro/undergraduates/academic-policies---procedures.html


 

Biological Anthropology considers human evolutionary history, the causes of present genetic diversity, and biological aspects of human behavior. It uses the evidence and concepts of paleontology, primate studies, population genetics, growth and nutrition, and ecology.

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